MOM Art Annex: Exhibition & Education Center

By

12 Days of Gender Studies – The Students of MC

ABOUT THIS BLOG SERIES:

Martha Joy Rose

The holiday season is upon us. You know the song: The Twelve Days of Christmas. This year we’ve got a little twist.

I’ve been teaching “Codes of Gender” at Manhattan College since August and the students have presented a number of ideas, poems, manifestos, and in-class presentations that explain some of their thoughts and interpretations of the work we’ve been engaged with.

This seems like a pretty good opportunity to wrap up the semester and share some of the students’ inspiration. The content is entirely the students’. Some have included their names and some have remained anonymous.

The important thing is that collectively we have been engaged in deep contemplation about the world we live in. Together we’ve explored language, theory, and the media in order to better understand difference as well as to more thoughtfully navigate our families, friendships, workplace, and deeply held belief systems. Sociology teaches us to expand our perspective and to look more honestly at our social and cultural experiences, breaking down privilege, power, and of course the patriarchy. I hope you enJOY reading these as much as I’ve appreciated working with these incredible young minds.

As the song goes:

Day 2: two turtle doves

Day 3: three French hens

Day 4: four calling birds

Day 5: five gold rings

Day 6: six geese a-laying

Day 7: seven swans a-swimming

Day 8: eight maids a-milking

Day 9: nine ladies dancing

Day 10: 10 lords a-leaping

Day 11: 11 pipers piping

Day 12: 12 drummers drumming

And a partridge in a pear tree!

# #

By Mario Ynfante

A Manifesta for Men Allies of Feminism in 2018

  1. To create a society where women aren’t seen as inferior, and instead are seen as equal. Eliminating derogatory vocabulary and replacing it with positive terms so that instead of bringing down our women, we push them to the forefront.
  2. To disagree with cultural norms and traditions that promote the patriarchy. Fighting against the way media, specifically movies, tv shows, music, and social media depicts women.
  3. To live in solidarity with women of all races, social class, and genders. Men included must help out with the cause.
  4. To act on our analysis and grievances. Only thinking about what’s wrong and analyzing it won’t change anything. A true activist doesn’t only think about what makes them uncomfortable they act on it.
  5. To not be afraid to speak up when women are being disrespected. Eliminating “locker room” talk because once again it promotes the patriarchy we currently live in.
  6. To educate yourself on what is sexual harassment and what is considered rape. Many of the things you say or do are wrong but they are so widely accepted in this androcentric society that they are ignored.
  7. To fight against double standards. Men are seen as “the man” when they have a lot of sexual partners but on the other hand women are seen as “sluts” if they do the same.
  8. Promoting the liberation of women’s bodies. Women can do what they want with their bodies, dress how they want, and most importantly have the right to choose whether they want to reproduce or not.

# #

By Isabella Bozkent

A Manifesto for a Better Tomorrow :

“In every way, shape, and form, we are at war” and so we must:

  1. Ensure the public is available to proper health care and health education. Regardless of race, class, sexual orientation, or gender.
  2. Make explicit the true nature of what is in the food people eat as well as the true nature of the chemicals in skincare, makeup, and other things absorbed by our bodies.
  3. Liberate those from the social constructs that prohibit them from living prosperous stigma-free lives. In liberating others, we liberate ourselves.
  4. “Pass the Equal Rights Amendment so we can have a constitutional foundation of righteousness and equality upon which future women’s rights conventions will stand.”
  5. Develop a world built off of understanding. To promote and praise curiosity that leads to information consumption. Knowledge is the only way to combat misunderstanding, fear of the “other”, and xenophobia.
  6. Promote the need for better treatment and rights for those who have been oppressed and victimized due to systemic oppression, abusive relationships, or unjust social dynamics. This task must be spearheaded by those with the privilege bestowed upon them from birth. They must recognize their privilege and use it for good as a tool to gain equality.
  7. Emphasize that caring for the environment, is caring for ourselves, and each other. To educate others of the very real issues that surround climate change. How many of these issues will affect the poor and disadvantaged before anyone else. How in many third world countries environmental issues are blamed on women and they are punished and ostracised from communities due to the lack of education and information available to them.
  8. “Work towards a nonviolent art by dedicating ourselves to living nonviolently. In art and life, create flexible and inclusive schemes for living that encompass respect, non-hierarchy, nonviolence, and tolerance. Art making is powerful; and a nonviolent art is a duty. Bodies such as the United Nations can be useful and fair, if: it stops favoring rich nations, it represents Latin America and Africa, not just North America, Europe and Asia, it prohibits the abuse of war in self-defense, veto power is taken away from the most powerful countries, and it enforces labor and environmental laws.” – Manifesto for a Utopian Turn.

Student-made Domestic Violence Awareness Brochure By Alia Flanigan & Mario Ynfante

 Download the PDF: Domestic Violence Brochure

# #

By Laura O’Neil

My Manifesta

  1. I believe all members of a family who have welcomed a new member of society 
should get paid family leave for six months.
  2. I believe all feminists should be a part of the movement in future years. The voting 
block ideally should be 18- 100, you are never too old to make a difference
  3. I believe boys at a young age should be taught the dangers of toxic masculinity. And 
be encouraged to be emotional, sensitive people.
  4. To put an emphasis on young children in school getting involved in politics. Teach 
kids about different political parties and the foundational beliefs each possesses. 
Change will come from the youth.
  5. To have universal healthcare available for all classes and races, regardless of gender.
  6. To be more vigilant in investigations of sexual assault/ harassment whether it takes 
place, at a university, a workplace, or in the military.
  7. To liberate women of all ages from slut-shaming and bullying. This can be more 
harmful than physical violence to someone’s psyche.
  8. Most importantly, to pass the Equal Rights Amendment.

# #

By Victoria Barreto 

My Manifesta

  1. To stop sluts shaming women for the choices they make when men aren’t slut-shamed for their choices.
  2. To stop blaming the victim in rape cases based on what they might have worn or any other way of blaming.
  3. To stop making excuses for boys’ sexist behaviors during adolescence such as “boys will be boys”. We should be teaching our boys to be more fluid and to respect women and other men.
  4. To make equal pay for women.
  5. To put more women in political office.
  6. To stop telling women what to do with their bodies such as telling women they cannot have an abortion or get access to birth control.
  7. Constitutional equality.
  8. Stereotypes against women and men’s attitudes such as the Kavanaugh case as an example.
  9. Affordable care act and fixing women’s health care.
  10. 4 out of five women are sexually trafficked.
  11. To higher more women in the sciences and technology fields.
  12. Maternity leave in the USA is horrible compared to other countries. Paid family leave and childcare: Behind other countries

# #

Accept Everybody

By Katie Compton

Over the course of my own childhood, there were various advertisements being made on the daily, whether they be about beauty and dieting, or something so simple as shampoo, the women that were showcased in these commercials were PERFECT. There is no other way to describe it but like as such because there was not a single flaw on their body. So, you can imagine the issues that this caused for me growing up, as I believed that that was how women were meant to look, always. In the video that we were asked to watch, it goes through the “behind the scenes” of the making of the advertisement of a woman who looks beautiful from the beginning, is Photoshopped into something that she is most certainly not.

They tweak her body into making it thinner, making her eyes bigger, her nose narrower, her breasts large, but her butt small; I mean the list just goes on and on. However, in comparison to this video, the Dove campaign did one very similar. They started close up to a woman with her natural face, but then as the video goes on, it shows all of the edits being made to her. By the end of the video, similar to the one we watched for class, the image at the end reflected nothing of the woman from the beginning.

Part of the reason I think I experienced such gender fluidity growing up was that I never thought I could compete with a look such as the one that was so frequently displayed everywhere I looked. The biggest issue with it was not that they were making the woman look like another human, but the fact that we, as a society, were forced to believe that this was how she looked all along. Her appearance was completely fabricated, and the issue that is entailed is how much young girls AND boys look to these advertisements thinking that is the only way they can look to be accepted by society.

Something certainly must change in the very near future if we are going to allow ourselves to start accepting our bodies and appearances for what they are. Because the fact of the matter is, you cannot Photoshop yourself when you are walking down the street. That is when you are completely and utterly, YOU. So, we as a society, are going to have to start making some adjustments in our advertising if we are going to make it a more accepting and body positive environment for ALL.

Works Cited:

“Dove Evolution.” YouTube, YouTube, 6 Oct. 2006,           www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYhCn0jf46U

# #

By Christian Munoz

The name of this poem is

As time goes by, women do not forget that easy

Or

The name of this poem is

Pain, suffering, harassment can’t be wiped out. Instead, it becomes scars

Or

The name of this poem is

Women had to endure unjust behaviors!

Or

The name of this poem is

Women having to endure patriarchy system

Or

The name of this poem is

Men as the main focus, while women hoping one day be able to work

Or

The name of this poem is

How being a man it is considered a privilege within society

Or

The name of this poem is

The fight against sexism continues

Or

The name of this poem is

Thanks to Sojourner Truth, for evolving women standards and to inspire others on keeping the battle going

Or

The name of this poem is

Making the world a better place to live

Or

The name of this poem is

Asking equality among all gender, race and cultural

OR

The name of this poem is

Enough is enough!!

Anonymous

Growing up in a house full of women has allowed me to really embrace my identity as a woman especially being the daughter of two very liberal, lesbian, feminists. I have realized that I am very privileged to have two very educated mothers who have supported me throughout my education and helped me look at the world with a very open heart. I do have to admit that I grew up in some kind of a bubble and I realized that before but it really made me realize that after the conversation we had in class the other day about the high schools we attended.

Growing up in my town it was very common for kids to openly express their affection for the same sex. In fact, it was actually very normal. I don’t even think I can count on my two hands the number of friends I had growing up that were openly bisexual or gay. I can remember the first time I realized that growing up in a town that was so accepting of others was as common as I thought. It was when we had planned to take a vacation to the Outer Banks. We ended up not going due to the enactment of the bathroom law that discriminated against transgendered people. Not only did we want to support a state with such awful laws, but we also did not feel safe going to a state with such policies that stand against the LGBTQ community. After learning about Judith Butler and her theory on gender, I realize how everything in this world is essentially based on male or female. With that said I like Butlers belief that gender is not something one is, it is something one does (Butler).

Each and every single day I continue to learn how privileged I am to be a heterosexual living in a world that is based on heteronormativity. I can’t even imagine what it would be like to have a fear of using a public bathroom. Looking at the world through the lens of a symbolic interactionist, I believe that a lot of these stereotypes, inequalities, and injustices are all due to the interactions that people have with society and they are all socially constructed concepts that are easily changeable.

Unlock

By Tiffany Recio 

Who am I?

Can you see me?

Do my curves seduce you?

Does my skin submit me?

Does my bank account show my value?

Does my sexuality make me normal?

Does my faith startle you?

Does my health show my talents?

Does my family intimidate you?

Does my intelligence shock you?

Does my accent alarm you?

Should I like pink?

Should I be silent?

Should I abandon faith?

Should I cover up?

Should I fail math?

Should I lose my accent?

Should I hide my home?

Should I be normal?

No. Nothing is Normal.

You can’t dominate me.

My skin is mine to conquer.

My value isn’t so easy to label.

You can’t shake my faith.

My abilities aren’t my title.

My family is my foundation.

Who cares for your disillusions?

Heteronormativity is archaic.

Sexism is a social disease.

Racism is ignorant.

Genderism is small-minded.

Ableism is cruel. 
Look at yourself, first.

Long Way To Go

By Laura O’Neill

The plight of women has been a long one.

Giving life to men who have no empathy ain’t fun.

The first waves of feminism began in 1820.

But it’s been two hundred years, and we still can’t get equal money.

All women have faced the struggle.

But black women have faced it double.

Sojourner Truth had to plead with her white sisters, to see her as a woman.

Looking back, our history can seem quite inhuman.

The battle is far from won when it comes to binary options
It’s time to throw away all your presumptions.

Radical feminism may seem intense.

But when a man gets paid a $1, Latina women earn just 54 cents.

Heteronormativity can keep people from living their best life.

Most women have big dreams, more than just a wife.

Cis-humans have to make being an ally a priority.

And eventually love and acceptance will be the majority.

What are the consequences of gender norms?

Olivia Warnock writes – Gender norms are perceived behaviors and personality traits surrounding one’s sex. When one acts outside of gender norms within a social setting, others can act out passive aggressiveness or even open hostility. Examples of common gender norms for men are “strong”, “assertive”, and “emotionless”. Common gender norms for women are “sensitive”, “irrational”, and “passive”. People can also assert something called social control which is when one attempts to change the course of the current situation by exerting their own expectations. This includes giving someone a dirty look, replying with a negative remark, earning less money from a job, or losing a promotion. Other discriminatory actions can include excluding individuals or groups from everyday social activities.

# #

Growing up in a Household Full of Boys

By Melanie Alberto
People always ask me
“What is it like growing up in a household with all boys?”
And I, of course, knew the answer to that.
Growing up in a household full of boys was wild.
We played sports inside the house
Wrestled with each other till we cried
And competed for literally everything
I was the only and youngest girl

But that did not stop me from being one of the boys
I never wore dresses,
Rarely played with dolls and dollhouses
Makeup was nonexistent to me.
I behaved like a boy because I grew up around boys
My father let me dress however I wanted to,
So naturally, I dressed in boy shorts, sneakers, and baggy shirts
It wasn’t until I was in Middle School that I started to see the difference.
Girls my age wore pretty floral dresses,
With flats instead of sneakers and hairpins in their hair
My brothers called them “girly”
And I thought to myself
“Am I not a girl because I’m not girly?”
I felt different because I looked different and acted different
In High School was when I changed
I still played sports and hung around with my brothers
But I dressed differently and
My brothers claimed I acted differently
Which now that I think about it I guess that I did.
It wasn’t that I changed who I was completely
I just welcomed and embraced my “girly” side
I still dressed in baggy clothes whenever I wanted to
Because clothes do not define my gender
Only I can define my gender
No one can.

I Am Black, Black as Night

Victoria Barreto

There, I was black as can be.

Aren’t I a woman too?

Whom should dance and sing,

Like the pale lady’s do?

No, I am black, and have no rights.

I am black, black as night.

I am black I see no light.

Mark of Cain that’s what I have,

My skin gives no privilege.

Instead it takes and takes

For I wish to scream,

“you have no power over me”

But I have to wait for the waves to come.

I have to wait for the first wave,

So, the pale ladies can get the vote,

Then I wait for the second,

So, they can start to work,

My back has scars from the work,

But the pale ladies need equality among pale men.

Then the third wave comes, this is my time.

I only had to wait hundreds of years to catch this wave.

It only took hundreds of years to free my bonds,

It only took blood sweat and tears for them to see,

See my color as good and something to save.

To see my experiences as valid,

To see my children as being worthy of education,

Not immigration.

It only took hundreds of years,

But its because I am black, black as night

And yet still I have no right.

# #

By

This Year For Mothers’ Day – Buy a Book, Attend a Conference or Gallery, Share Knowledge

Mothers’ Day Week 2016

2016 INDUCTIONS to the Motherhood Hall of Fame; Honor the Call of the Midwife – Join us!

Thursday, May 5 – Motherhood Hall of Fame; Columbia Teacher’s College 7:30-9PM (Free). 525 West 120th Street Milbank Chapel, NYC.

Join us for drinks before at 7PM. RSVP Pleasehttps://mommuseum.org/motherhood-hall-of-fame/

Performances, story-telling, and induction ceremony with co-sponsors:

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR HONOREES

Ruth Lubic (ED.D. ‘79, M.A. ‘61, B.S. ‘59)

Kimm Sun, is a Certified Nurse Midwife, Nurse Practitioner

MHOF_Header_2016

12th Annual M.O.M. Academic Conference

THEORIZING MOTHERHOOD IN THE ACADEMY

***M.O.M. Conference Panelists and Presenters – See Schedule. Each time slot is 20 minutes (unless I have written to tell you differently)***

Friday, May 6th MORNING OPENING KEYNOTE: Laura Tropp specializes in media and politics and representations of pregnancy, motherhood, and families in popular culture.

Saturday, May 7th MORNING OPENING KEYNOTE: Kimberly Seals Allers whose 5th book The Big Let Down will be published this summer. Kimberly is an award-winning journalist, author and a nationally recognized media commentator, speaker, consultant and advocate for infant health.

MORE at M.O.M./ FULL SCHEDULE

FACILITIES

We will be meeting in the Alumni Room, which is in the lower portion of the library. Look for signs, or take the elevator from the O’Malley Library.

TECH SUPPORT

There is a power point projector, computer, speaker, and screen onsite. Bring your laptop or a zip drive, or post your material in the cloud and you will be able to present using the equipment at our location. There is some limited space for brochures, art, and books as well. Feel free to share your passions.

BAGEL & COFFEE BREAKFAST WILL BE PROVIDED EACH DAY

SOCIAL MEDIA 

Do you have a twitter handle or a Facebook page? Let’s connect!!

  1. @MOMmuseum
  2. https://www.facebook.com/MOMmuseum/

CONFERENCE LOCATION

May 6-7 MOM Conference at Manhattan College, 4513 Manhattan College Parkway, Bronx, NY 10471 (Schedule TBD) – We will updating the schedule in the next few weeks.

TRANSPORTATION

New York City has two major airports: JFK and LaGuardia.

Public transportation is available from both via train, and cab.

The train from JFK is rather straightforward and costs about $7.50. I would encourage you not to be fearful about taking this option if budget is a concern. There are people at the airport who can direct you, and I’ve done this many times. Here is a link to the NYC Subway Map: http://web.mta.info/nyct/maps/subwaymap.pdf

PANELS, CULTURE, and SPECIAL GATHERINGS

New York City is an amazing place. Surely you will want to do a little exploring. We also plan on organizing a few special panels, roundtable discussions, and speakers for you, but will make sure there is time in the evenings to step out, either with conference goers or on your own.

GETTING AROUND

Here is a subway map of Manhattan.

FYI, the subway that best serves Manhattan College is the #1 or #6 train on the West SideLink to more info and directions to MC.

Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions. We will continue to update the Conference tab.

  • ALSO PLEASE SEE – DEMETER PRESS – NEW RELEASE – NEW MATERNALISMSORDER NOW
  • New_Maternalisms

By

Year End Report [CLICK]

Thank You To Our Friends, Supporters, and Partners

This has been a wonderful year for collaboration. M.O.M. saw three new initiatives launch in 2015. They included the Procreate Project along with The Mom Egg Review, Project Afterbirth, and the Jewish Biennale 2015 at Hechel Schlomo Museum in Israel (download press about this Jewish Biennal_Report here).

The Museum director Martha Joy Rose, also had opportunities to write and teach this year on behalf of M.O.M. She contributed to the M/other Voices Column, Demeter Press‘s forthcoming book on New Maternalisms, and was active teaching courses in Families and Social Change at Manhattan College in New York.

It is necessary and important that collaborations like these thrive. Programs that support mothers in the arts, acknowledge the economic value of caregivers, and promote education in the areas of mother (and father) studies are good for families and society. They help humanity evolve consciously and thoughtfully benefiting all people: they spread joy, they enlighten, lift, and create a communities of shared values.

Together we are creating our future today!

Jewish_Biennal_Report

Read the M/other Voices full essay here (and below).

A M/OTHER MOVEMENT FOR THE MASSES

Standing at the podium, about to begin a lecture to the twenty students in front of me at Manhattan College, I pop on a power point and click through the images of women creating mother-made art. In this particular slide-show there are curated photos from the Procreate Project, Project Afterbirth, m/other voices, Ima Iyla’a: The Art of Motherhood, Mamapalooza, and Demeter Press, as well as striking text from the Mom Egg Review. The students seem interested. The images are provocative, often including everything from menstruation blood to musical instruments. I have known for a long time how important it is for women who are mothers to have an arts movement of their own. And yet, gaining traction has proved to be harder than I thought. For many reasons, social, political, and cultural, women still lag behind globally in the arts world. From filmmakers who reportedly comprise a mere 4.1% of the top grossing directors of major motion pictures,[1] to the Guerilla Girls-inspired rants calling out major contemporary museums for their lack of equal exhibition time, women in the arts still have a lot of catching up to do.[2] Motherhood complicates these inequities further for reasons that are difficult to identify, but let me try.

There are three major forces compounding mother’s visibility in the arts: identity, consensus, and physical dis/ability. Let us first look at identity. Before we can even begin to dive into the idea of a mother-inspired arts movement, we need to clarify what is a mother? You might feel like arguing with me that there is no need, but in fact there is a need. If one is going to create a mother-arts movement one has to know whom one is including, and what the point of your movement is. Are you going to call your arts event a celebration of motherhood? What about those who do not think it is an elation, but rather a great misery heaped on them when they were least prepared? Are you concerned about the procreative act itself? The carrying, and waiting for the development and birth of the future child? What are you going to do with the adoptive mothers who did not birth their babies but are finding their mother-identity through the act of caregiving? And what about the ones who lost their children along the way? Are you going to include parents; meaning the mother and the father? This is a lovely idea, but, if you include parents, what do you do to amplify the unique experience of one who cellularly divides? The one whose body goes through embodied changes? Then, what about the “single” mother, with no likely partner or spouse? What are you going to do with grandmothers, stepmothers, gay couples, and the surrogates? Unlike many other objects or identities, from the very beginning the notion of mother is fraught. She is not a simple creature. She might not even be a woman. Therefore, conceivably a mother might be a he. Likewise, politically speaking, a mother might be a religious, right-minded, anti-abortion, Phyllis Schlafly kind of character, or she might be a forthright, left-leaning feminist. She might be an advocate of something you hate, and therefore you are tempted to hate her, or she might be a killer, a thief, or an addict. She might be absent. Is she one whose story you want to include? Are you going to share your arts movement with her? Herein lies the crux of the number one problem of a m/other based movement. There are so many kinds. I have been masticating on this for the better part of 26 years trying to sort out its complications.

While writing my thesis for graduate school I struggled not only with a definition of mother, but also with a definition of what the academic study of mothers might include. My reasoning for this was twofold. In my experience as the creator of an arts festival, which has aimed to highlight the varying voices, art, comedy, music, theater, and literature of motherhood, I consistently wrestled with what to do with the women who were not mothers but were other-mothers, aunties, and nannies insisting they wanted their experiences to be included. I wrestled with what to do with the caregiving partners, fathers, grandparents, and children of these creative-types, mostly because thy also often inquired about being included. Sometimes mothers wanted to blend their families in their art making and even if they didn’t, non-mothers often wanted to feel they too could exercise their voice. This challenged my vision for mother-made art, if only in the sense that it constantly required me to question whom to include or not include? If the art is about family, what sets these mothers apart from the others they are connected to? What makes them unique, or special, or why should they have a festival, movement, arts-based collection all their own? We all know that historically women’s voices have been silent relatively and mothers even more so. That could be reason enough, but in the end, maybe not. Questions and complications remain. No one, including me, seems satisfied with exclusionary practices.

The second part of the dilemma is, if we could identify the specificities of what mother is, how do we gain consensus on whether she is worth studying or whether her art is specifically noteworthy and deserving of its own category? Considering that we have left the first question somewhat unanswered, then the second question of cooperation creates its own challenges. The status or category of mother is often fraught. She does not represent all good things despite the fact that we have expected her to be everything: creator, collaborator, connector, and caregiver, for free, forever, unconditionally? Mothers manifest their fair share of resentment, both for socially constructed reasons and for psychological ones. Feminist movements reluctantly embrace motherhood if at all, and even mothers themselves seem unsure whether they care more about activism, equal wages, or getting dinner on the table. There is not enough time in this essay to adequately address this, although many have tried including Adrienne Rich[3] and Phyllis Chesler[4] for example. Let us for the purposes of this article simply say that it is extremely difficult to get people to agree on a consensus regarding mothers, mother-art, and motherhood.

Finally, leaving the answers to the first two issues ambiguous, we can now move to the very real challenges most mothers face, which include ability, time, and perspective. As any mother of a young one will attest to, creating anything other than limited cleanliness, order, income, and edible food can be a full-time occupation. Mix in the ephemeral nature of art and challenges arise. How does one find the hours in the day (or night)? The space? Some regularity? Should one buy paints or food? Make music or buy shoes? Natalie Loveless claims in her curated exhibit titled New Maternalisms that “mama-artists [need] to find creative ways of integrating their practices as mothers, artists, curators, writers, and teachers. By taking seriously the need to create from local and embodied conditions, these practices bring visibility and value to the maternal in and as art.”[5] I agree with her. But, as I have articulated, distinct challenges remain.

Ultimately, the notion of exactly what makes a mother, be it birth, caregiving, egg donation, or identity can all be debated. However, we define what a mother is and what the art-movement looks like, it must include relational aspects. Words like m/other, m/otherness, or mother-ness attempt to describe this. Any idea of mother must include the concept of transformation, inclusion, and evolution. Both the personal and relational status of me + other = m/other proposes an examination of how m/otherness or mother-ness is the experience of being connected, or disconnected, to one who is part of you. Or, of being a person who, as part of another and also linked to another (genetically, through caregiving, or by association), might inform action in a world conceived as relational. This view differs from our current social system. Current systems have been motivated by alienation, and by violent, external, institutional, and hierarchical social constructions. Herein’ lies the call for change. As Rothman asserts in the Book of Life, “The world that I live in, and the world that I want for my children, is not a world of scattered isolated individuals, and not a world of walls. It is a world of communities, of social solidarity, of connectedness between individuals and between communities, a world in which people and communities grow from and into each other.” (p.233). She explains that motherhood is “otherhood.” Or, as I theorize here: a mother is one who who divides, yet through that division he/she is paradoxically increased. Therefore, the division is also a multiplication. A theory of mother-ness privileges the conversation of difference (or division) and insists on tolerant engagement (connection) as well as intense intellectual curiosity as a fundamental practice. Therefore, as we make art, explore motherhood, and find ways to move forward, let us lift each other up. Let us continue to explore our victories as we lament our losses. Let us speak not with one voice, but with many voices and most of all – let that be okay.

BIO: ART, RESEARCH, THEORY: In the December column we are pleased to feature Martha Joy Rose, (USA), a New York-based performance artist, scholar, and the mother of four young adults ages 21-26. Having been named as “God Mother of Mom Rock” by the CNN, Joy has been making music since the early 1980’s in New York City. With the birth of her first child she created the Housewives On Prozac band, which has enjoyed international success and spawned a mother-made music movement. In 2002, seeking to identify the unique expressions of women who are mothers and to amplify their voices, Joy founded the Mamapalooza Festival, currently being administrated each May through the New York Parks Department. In 2009, she directed the film The Motherhood Movement: You Say You Want a Revolution, which promotes, showcases, and makes visible maternal discussion, disseminating information on the subject of Feminist/activist Mothers and the missions of International Maternal agencies. Working together with a team of academics and activists, Joy opened the first-ever Museum of Motherhood (M.O.M.) on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in 2011. Currently she is teaching “Families and Social Change” at Manhattan College. Joy’s Master’s Degree in Mother Studies is a herstoric first, and she has written for Sage Press, Demeter Press, and assorted literary journals.

By

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR ACCEPTED CONFERENCE PRESENTERS

MOM_logo_SM

THEORIZING MOTHERHOOD IN THE ACADEMY

VIEW NEWSLETTER

– THIS YEAR’S CONFERENCE –

2016 INDUCTIONS Honor the Call of the Midwife

Thursday, May 5 Motherhood Hall of Fame; Columbia Teacher’s College 7:30-9PM (Free). 525 West 120th Street Milbank Chapel, NYC.

Join us for drinks before at 7PM. RSVP Pleasehttps://mommuseum.org/motherhood-hall-of-fame/

Performances, story-telling, and induction ceremony with co-sponsors:

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR HONOREES

Ruth Lubic (ED.D. ‘79, M.A. ‘61, B.S. ‘59) has championed community-based birthing by listening to the needs of the people she serves. It’s an approach she honed at TC. Lubic is considered among the mothers of the American midwifery movement. The recipient of a MacArthur “genius award,” she co-founded the National Association of Childbearing Centers, has inspired creation of more than 300 free-standing birth centers and is an American Academy of Nursing “living legend.”

Kimm Sun, is a Certified Nurse Midwife, Nurse Practitioner who attends home births in New York City.  Previously a photographer, she started her midwifery career as a labor and delivery nurse over ten years ago and then worked in a community hospital as a staff midwife.  She received her Midwifery and Nurse Practitioner degree from the University of Pennsylvania. Born in Malaysia and of Chinese heritage, she speaks five languages and has taught birth attendants in Micronesia, Haiti, Nepal, Vietnam and Kenya. Besides caring for her much loved “mama clients”, she is currently developing a different approach to birth education that is more accurate to the woman’s actual internal experience.

MHOF_Logos_2016

12th Annual M.O.M. Academic Conference

THEORIZING MOTHERHOOD IN THE ACADEMY

(I expect to have the final schedule posted online over the weekend. Through the date of your presentation will not change, some time slots may be adjusted.)

LauraFriday, May 6th MORNING OPENING KEYNOTE: Laura Tropp specializes in media and politics and representations of pregnancy, motherhood, and families in popular culture. She teaches courses in communication theory, media history, campaigns and elections, media law and motherhood studies. Her books include: Womb With A View and Deconstructing Dads.

KimSaturday, May 7th MORNING OPENING KEYNOTE: Kimberly Seals Allers whose 5th book The Big Let Down will be published this summer. Kimberly is an award-winning journalist, author and a nationally recognized media commentator, speaker, consultant, and advocate for infant health. A former senior editor at ESSENCE and writer at FORTUNE magazine. Kimberly is widely considered a leading voice in the counterculture movement in infant feeding. Kimberly’s fifth book, The Big Let Down—How Medicine, Big Business and Feminism Undermine Breastfeeding will be published by St. Martin’s Press this summer.

MORE at M.O.M.

FACILITIES

There is a power point projector, computer, speaker, and screen onsite. Bring your laptop or a zip drive, or post your material in the cloud and you will be able to present using the equipment at our location. There is some limited space for brochures, art, and books as well. Feel free to share your passions.

BAGEL & COFFEE BREAKFAST WILL BE PROVIDED EACH DAY

SOCIAL MEDIA 

Do you have a twitter handle or a Facebook page? Let’s connect!!

  1. @MOMmuseum
  2. https://www.facebook.com/MOMmuseum/

CONFERENCE LOCATION

May 6-7 MOM Conference at Manhattan College, 4513 Manhattan College Parkway, Bronx, NY 10471 (Schedule TBD) – We will updating the schedule in the next few weeks.

TRANSPORTATION

New York City has two major airports: JFK and LaGuardia.

Public transportation is available from both via train, and cab.

The train from JFK is rather straightforward and costs about $7.50. I would encourage you not to be fearful about taking this option if budget is a concern. There are people at the airport who can direct you, and I’ve done this many times. Here is a link to the NYC Subway Map: http://web.mta.info/nyct/maps/subwaymap.pdf

PANELS, CULTURE, and SPECIAL GATHERINGS

New York City is an amazing place. Surely you will want to do a little exploring. We also plan on organizing a few special panels, roundtable discussions, and speakers for you, but will make sure there is time in the evenings to step out, either with conference goers or on your own.

ACCOMMODATIONS

Manhattan is divided into the West and East sides, with subway trains that operate separately on either side of the city. It can be a 40 minute trek from the West to East side, either by bus, or foot, or crosstown subway. TRY to stay on the WEST SIDE IF POSSIBLE, anywhere from Times Square to the north: West 40th Street, 50s, 70’s, all the way to Harlem etc. Included here is a subway map of Manhattan.

FYI, the subway that best serves Manhattan College is the #1 or #6 train on the West SideLink to more info and directions to MC.

Mother Studies is a field of interdisciplinary study devoted to the issues, experiences, topics, history, and culture of mothers, mothering, and motherhood. How else can we identify and define this new and emerging field? Some proposed concepts include “me” and “otherness” or m/otherness interpretations, procreation, caregiving, maternal health, motherhood as experience and institution, and relational theory as navigated within social and cultural constructions. What are its key elements, its compliments, and how can we theorize motherhood in the academy? How can mother and/or father studies be introduced in more formal ways within classrooms, including high school? Do we need an interdisciplinary degree in mother or father studies on the undergraduate or graduate level? If you are already teaching motherhood or mothering studies, or fatherhood, fathering studies, from what perspective or discipline do you approach the work? Please share your ideas. This is the forum to put this field into place.

WE HOPE TO SEE YOU AT THIS YEAR’S EVENTS

Questions: Info@MOMmuseum.org

By

The Status of Mother Art Around The World [LINK]

ProCreate Project is due to launch at the Women´s Art Library at Goldsmiths University in London, England on the 15th of December, 2015. Over 100 featured ‪#‎motherartists‬. #JoinMama Book your free ticket here [LINK]

Here is my personal statement regarding the current status of mother-art around the world by M. Joy Rose:

(Martha) Joy Rose

(Martha) Joy Rose

I’ve been organizing the Mamapalooza Festival (worldwide) since 2002, which was inspired by the adventures of my mom-rock band, Housewives on Prozac (1997-2008). The intention was to support a mother-made-arts-movement and to activate social change for women who were mothers because: a) mother-made art was not being encouraged, b) venues for maternally-inspired artistic expression were non-existent. Motherhood generates its own reasons for celebration as well as illuminating a unique set of challenges. It was my very strong feeling that women who were artists should not ignore the procreative and caregiving aspects of their new-found embodied existence and that opportunities for mother-made-art should flourish.

By creating an inclusive, large-scale platform, I licensed the festival to event organizers ultimately reaching four countries and twenty-five cities. Hoping to open the portals to individual (and family) creativity as well as call attention to the specific issues women who are mothers and caregivers face. The festival garnered millions of followers through media stories generated by local events. The issues we tackled were broadly related to everything from acknowledging the liberating power of creative self-expression amidst the self-sacrificing nature of motherhood, to enhancing community engagement, as well as educating families at risk in the health, economic, and the reproductive justice arena.

ProCreateAfter years of organizing and promoting Mamapalooza through our non-profit Motherhood Foundation Inc. (2003-2010), the focus shifted to the long-term goal of having a physical location for the Museum of Motherhood. We procured a donated space in New York City from 2011-2014 where 60,000 people from around the world enjoyed our collaborative location. M.O.M. is currently online and conducts international academic conferences on the topic of mother studies (2005-ongoing). I got my graduate degree in mother studies in 2015 and am teaching through the museum portal, conducting classes in “families and social change” at Manhattan College, and writing about my experiences. Goals include continued international partnerships and a next-level space for exhibitions, classes, and archiving the science, art, and history of mothers, fathers, and families. The Mamapalooza Outdoor Extravaganza Festival continues to host approximately 10,000 families on the third Sunday of May each year in partnership with the New York Parks Department at Riverside Park South in Manhattan, USA.

I am thrilled to collaborate with the Procreate Project! Please stay in touch through MOMmuseum.org. See also Mamapalooza.com #JoinMama @MarthaJoyRose @MOMmuseum @Mamapalooza

By

Annual Academic M.O.M. Conference 2015

10 YEARS AND GOING STRONG
Greetings Annual Academic M.O.M. Conference Participants –
See you on Thursday, April 30th at The Graduate Center in NYC room 9205 which is adjoined to room 9206, and May 1-2 Friday-Saturday at Manhattan College.
We hope you are as excited as we are about this year’s conference.
There are presenters attending from all over the globe, and we look forward to welcoming local students and community members to the presentations.
Thursday morning:
10a: Conference Introduction: Martha Joy Rose
4:45-5:45 Keynote: Barbara Katz Rothman: Women as Fathers
Presenters: If you have not yet paid at this point – please do! It will make the registration process go much smoother. Payment link is:MOMmuseum. We welcome donations too.
The event is free and open to the public for the purposes of more widely disseminating information about Mother Studies. So, feel free to invite friends, family, and your students.
At this point, programs have been ordered, breakfast has been planned (Friday only), and promotions are ongoing.
RADIO & SOCIAL MEDIA
We are pleased to announce that an experimental digital humanities online radio project is underway and we have hopes of launching it with a full day of broadcasting during the conference on Friday April 30th. We are hoping people will be able to tune into CUNYcast.net and access a live broadcast of the conference if they are not able to attend.
We will also be tweeting @MOMmuseum @CUNYcast and FB-ing
Regarding the following items:
Book Sales * Power Points * Microphones * Room Set Up
Please go ONLINE and READ carefully everything that is posted.
You should find answers to most questions there!
PROGRAM AND PRESENTATION INFO

FULL PROGRAM INFO: Including continental breakfast on Friday at MC and parking pass if you are driving.

We do NOT have an official book seller. If you wish to bring books to sell, then you will be responsible, although we will do our best to provide help at the registration desk. If you have flyers or CFPs you are welcome to bring those too.
You can bring books to sell all 3 days.
We will provide a table?
You do not need to mind your books the whole time- honor system usually works.
We do not take a cut of your sales.
Don’t bring too many- you’ll be miserable schlepping them around the city. Maybe a dozen?
You are also welcome to bring postcards, flyers and CFPs.
Presentations take place within a typical classroom, with power point capabilities, etc: Zip drive, online presos, and computer plug in should all work, but I encourage you to bring BACK UP just in case. (For example. Post your presentation online at a place where you can access it, just in case.)
TRANSPORTATION
New York City has two major airports: JFK and LaGuardia.
Public transportation is available from both via train, and cab.
The train from JFK is rather straightforward and costs about $7.50. I would encourage you not to be fearful about taking this option if budget is a concern. There are people at the airport who can direct you, and I’ve done this many times. Here is a link to the NYC Subway Map: http://web.mta.info/nyct/maps/subwaymap.pdf
CONFERENCE LOCATION
Mid-Town MANHATTAN – Thursday, April 30, the conference this year will take place at The Graduate Center; 365 5th Ave. (at 34th St)
BRONX (a Borough of Manhattan) Friday & Saturday, May 1-2, at Manhattan College, 4513 Manhattan College Parkway, Bronx, NY 10471
(These two institutions are about a 40 minute subway ride w/brief walk from each other) We are starting registration each day at 9:00 giving people more time for travel :-))

MORE
The Graduate Center is across the street from the Empire State Building, and very centrally located. There are many hotels in the area. I recommend staying in Manhattan, as the hotels are all easily linked by mass transit, which is not the case in the Bronx.
Manhattan is divided into the West and East sides, with subway trains that operate separately on either side of the city. It can be a 40 minute trek from the West to East side, either by bus, or foot, or crosstown subway. It might be easier to stay on the WEST SIDE IF POSSIBLE.
FYI, the subway that best serves Manhattan College is the #1 or #6 train on the West SideLink to more info. Even more info.
 
READ MORE ABOUT THE CONFERENCE HERE [CLICK]
 
With Great Warmth – 
M. Joy Rose on behalf of the MOM Academic Committee