MOM Art Annex: Exhibition & Education Center

By

Sociology Opens Our Eyes to New Ways of Seeing the World!

This summer, extreme weather rocks America and pundits debate while August arrives all too quickly. Since July 1st, accounting majors, economics majors, and students of literature have been increasing their knowledge and vocabulary about important issues that affect us all by studying sociology. These students are hard at work exploring theoretical assertions about race, class, and gender in an online summer intensive Introduction to Sociology course, specifically framed around the Sociology of Family.

Using texts that explore gestation, birth, and caregiving, authors Barbara Katz Rothman, Phyllis Chesler, Patricia Hill Collins, and Keisha Goode (to name a few), explore women’s experiences, racial disparities, and gendered labor. This week, we read the latest media stories on wombs, trans-birth, uterus transplants, and self-identified men as mothers. We have all been scrambling for new definitions and fresh ways of thinking about gestation as well as parenting.

As part of a service-learning portion of an Intro to Sociology class, students were asked to take a piece of construction paper or plain white paper and mark in bold words a minimum of 5 words that best describe “mother” and “father”. We have been complicating those basic notions ever since.

Thinking about the authors we are studying assert about biology and gender, coupled with recent medical and policy developments, motherhood is more complicated than ever! The students were invited to revisit their original posters and articulate some of the information that has influenced their perspective in recent weeks. Some of their notes are below:

Words Added:

–       Gender Neutral:

·      The readings from this week highlighted the problems associated with gendered parenting

·       Mothers struggle with work because of the perception that they are obligated to care for their home and children

·       Men do not feel obligated to do any parenting work but feel an overwhelming obligation to provide economically for their families

·      Both genders are equally capable of parenting in the form of motherhood and fatherhood

·      everyone including children would be better off if parental duties were split equally

·      All other words on the poster represent things my mother, grandparents, and stepfather did and that I wish my father had participated in

·      Not parenting is a personal choice not a gendered choice

–       Parent:

·      Added for reasons listed above

·      Parent should imply the same duties regardless of the parent’s gender

       Present:

·      Being present is an essential part of parenthood that I did not think about until I watched “Glen Henry got his Superpowers Through Fatherhood”

–       Care:

·      “Mothering is most likely done by a female due to our society’s definition of the word ‘mother.’ The action of mothering however is simply caring for another.” [Castaneda and Oware]

–       Guide

–       Educate

·      Guide and educate were both terms I did not think to put until I though in the context of parenthood rather than motherhood

·      Gendered expectations affect us all and are very pervasive

Assertion Statement:

Replace motherhood and fatherhood with parenthood

Father
• Tenderhearted
• Empathetic
• Compassionate
• Honest
• Supportive
• Sacrificing
• Wise
“A healthier masculinity can only be achieved if we acknowledge that “Tough” and “Strong” aren’t the only 2 characteristics men can be.”

By

M.A.M.A. 37- Clipping the Church and a Measure of Grace

Art by Tereza Buskova – ‘Clipping the Church’

In many cultures, even today, new mothers and their infants are subject to a period of physical seclusion or confinement from the rest of the world. During this time, the support of relatives and the local community plays a vital role in sustaining the family by caring for the older children, providing food and completing chores typically carried out by the mother herself. It is hard to imagine now that things were not so different for the generation of our own great-grandmothers.

No longer restricted by this custom, women today enjoy the benefits of improved healthcare, education and childcare options, which grant them greater freedom than ever before. Yet the stigma and judgment that come with pregnancy and early motherhood linger, whereas support of the local community has all but disappeared over time. Today’s society too often adopts a patronizing, utilitarian attitude which blinds it to the particular needs of parents and families. As a consequence, many new mothers experience feelings of loneliness and isolation from their social networks, unknown to them before. Some feel actively ostracised and judged when they should be encouraged and cherished.

Clipping the Church is a project based on an old English tradition in which parishioners ‘clip’ their local place of worship with hands and bodies and sing songs of a celebratory nature. The overarching aspect of this custom is inclusiveness and Buskova married it with the representation of motherhood expressed by the act of baking and sharing baked goods with family, friends and anonymous members of the community.

Dressed in traditional Czech outfits, ornate with sensuous red ribbons and elaborate baked accessories, two women lead a procession via Erdington’s High Street. Their white skirts are decorated with flowery patterns and bunched around their hips, emphasizing the connection with nature and its fertility.  The work subtly harks back to the history of Erdington, which remained a rural area until recent times. Accompanied by two young girls and followed by a simple wooden frame made of celestial crust (sugary pastries based on an old Czech recipe) topped by a small figurine of Virgin Mary and carried on men’s shoulders, the procession was joined by a multinational crowd, old and young. All precincts vanished for the duration of the performance and the lively chatting was underscored by accompanying cello music performed by Bela Emerson, resulting in a festive atmosphere that resonated within the surroundings.

One of the most moving and symbolically saturated moments of the procession took place upon its arrival at St Barnabas Church’s gate. There, Frieda Evans, the parish priest and the artist invited the crowd to ‘clip’ the church. Despite its overarching religious connotations, the act of forming a circle around the church added a universal dimension to this Christian custom. The church, decorated all the way around with sourdough bread in elaborate shapes hanging on red ribbons from the building’s façade, echoed the human bonds created around the church. Prepared by Buskova and the community members, this simple bake became a gesture of kindness and generosity. With the act of sharing and consuming the celestial crust, ‘Clipping the Church’ was finalized. The custom was reinvented, becoming not English, not Czech, but an inclusive community act.

Image credits: 

Erdingtonia Series, Tereza Buskova 2016
Image Size 21×15 cm
Archival inkjet print with gold screenprint overlays
Edition number 20 + 4AP’s

More about the artists: 

Tereza Buskova (b.1978, Prague) completed her Fine Art Printmaking MA at the Royal College of Art in 2007. Her intuitive practices capture and renew Czech folk traditions through a combination of film making, screen printing and performance. Buskova’s work has been exhibited at Rituals, David Roberts Art Foundation, London (2008);  A Tradition I Do Not Mean To Break, Zabludowicz Collection, London (2009);  Rituals Are Tellers Of Us, Newlyn Art Gallery, UK ( 2013); and Reality Czech: the Czech Avant-Garde, Whitechapel Gallery, London, 2015. She has exhibited, performed and lectured in a broad range of different spaces including Lincoln’s Chambers Farm Wood (2010), Kunstnernes Hus, Oslo (2014), and Erdington High Street, UK (2016).

The Mom Egg Review – Words
Measure of Grace
by Caitlin Grace McDonnell

The longest person’s eyelashes were ten inches,
or maybe six. I think 8. She lived in China,
my daughter tells me, who is nine, like the youngest soccer coach, in Barcelona, which,
she says, is the best. The length of your integrity
is directly correlated to your forearm in prayer.
If you want to be seen as a woman, wear a string
of pearls. If you want to be seen as everything,
make yourself scarce. Math is comforting, my
daughter says, because the answers are clear.
Meanwhile, the length of time between school
shootings decreases at a rate comparable
to the disappearance of the words “climate change”
from government documents. Or the disappearance
of ice in the Arctic sea, or honeybees from warm
habitats. Yesterday, Sudan, the last Northern White
Rhino was put down in Kenya. The buds that bloom
beneath my daughter’s breasts are harder than
I remember on my own body, my own breasts,
whose alveoli no longer make milk. If you squint
at two women, they can almost be one.

Caitlin Grace McDonnell was a New York Times Poetry Fellow at NYU, where she received her MFA. She has published a chapbook, Dreaming the Tree (belladonna books, 2003) and a book, Looking for Small Animals (Nauset Press, 2012). Her poems, essays and book reviews have appeared in numerous print and online publications, including Salon, Washington Square, Chronogram and more. She teaches writing in Brooklyn, NY, where she lives with daughter, Kaya Hope.

MAMA_Logo_2015

The Museum of Motherhood, the ProCreate Project, the Mom Egg Review, and the Mother Magazine are pleased to announce the launch of a bi-monthly international exchange of ideas and art. M.A.M.A. will celebrate the notion of being “pregnant with ideas” in new ways. This scholarly discourse intersects with the artistic to explore the wonder and the challenges of motherhood. Using words and art to connect new pathways between the creative, the academic, the para-academic, the digital, and the real, as well as the everyday: wherever you live, work, and play, the Art of Motherhood is made manifest. Download the Press Release here or read about updated initiatives#JoinMAMA  @ProcreateProj  @MOMmuseum @TheMomEgg

By

News From Around the World with MoM Partners in ART

Ruchika Wason Singh  
Visual Artist- Independent Researcher

Ruchika is the founder of A.M.M.A.A., Asia’s first platform for Mother Artists. She is a visiting professor at Ashoka University in Sonipat, India. We are sharing the Book of Drawing Marathon here in PDF Format. Please go to Ruchika’s website to find out more:

Ruchika Wason Singh

_

Also, the Procreate Project in England is proud to present a group exhibition featuring twenty short-listed artists of the Mother Art Prize 2018, the only international prize for self-identifying women and non-binary visual artists with caring responsibilities. The exhibition at Mimosa House, London will be curated by independent curator Marcelle Joseph, Zabludowicz Collection director Elizabeth Neilson, and Whitechapel Gallery curator Laura Smith. Find out more at Procreate Project online.
Mimosa House
12 Princes Street
London W1B 2LL

Events are May 3- May 16th

_

The Mom Egg Review is hosting the MER launch at Poet’s House on May 18th from 4-6 PM in New York City, NY. Link for more information is here.

By

Got Milk? Why Breastfeeding and Breast Milk Matters

Breastfeeding education and support for new mothers is an important ongoing issue. There are many decisions and questions regarding breastfeeding versus formula feeding. A few of those include: should you alternate between both bottle and breast, how long should you breastfeed over time, what type of latching-on techniques should you use, when is the time to start pumping, how should you store pumped milk, etc.?

As a new parent, one’s lactation questions can be endless. Why is breastfeeding important? Why should parents care?

There are many reasons why breast milk is regarded as the highest form of nutrition infants can obtain. Mothers pass important nutritional antibodies through breast milk that have been observed to benefit overall infant health. Breastfeeding potentially lessens the occurrence of long-term health conditions, such as the prevalence of obesity, type II diabetes, SIDS, gastrointestinal infections and asthma. Mothers also benefit, as breastfeeding promotes a natural way to rebalance hormones and maintain weight loss after pregnancy. Long-term health benefits also include reduced risk of female endocrine-related cancers, such as breast or ovarian cancer, high blood pressure and type II diabetes. In the US, it is recommended to breastfeed exclusively at least up to 6 months after birth. However, average statistics have shown only 1 in 4 women does so.

Student practicing with a breastfeeding doll at MOM

Despite the bonding benefits of breastfeeding and the positive health outcomes nursing may have for both mom and baby, the decision to nurse is not always an easy one. Everyone’s breastfeeding journey is personal and unique. Often, individuals require support and guidance through the post-birth journey. Sometimes problems arise. Women can experience lactating difficulties, latch issues, sometimes health concerns or pre-existing conditions prevent the possibility of breastfeeding, and women who experience mastitis are often confused about how to proceed.

In the Tampa Bay area, support can be found at many local organizations including the Tampa Bay Breastfeeding Task Force. The Tampa Bay Breastfeeding Task Force is a nonprofit organization that hosts events for breastfeeding activism, they also provide support and answers to questions via their social media and website platforms. Events such as Breastfeeding Friendly Daycare Training, promote their #TBBreastfeeds and the Breastfeeding Normalization Campaign. TBB is also known partners in advocacy efforts with the Florida Breastfeeding Coalition, which provides support for breastfeeding as well as promoting state recommended resources for those needing more information. Their mission “is to improve the health of Floridians by working collaboratively to protect, promote and support breastfeeding.”

If you are in need of professional assistance or are looking for more information, the La Leche League of Florida and the Caribbean Isles connects volunteers with lactation consultants and local nursing mothers’ groups. The Tampa Breastfeeding and Lactation Center LLC or Breastfeeding Care and Consulting, run by Jocelyn Pridemore also offers consultations for new mothers. Different services are available at a variety of prices from high to low. Additionally, if you are seeking access to breast milk, check out charitable organizations such as Mother’s Milk Bank of Florida, which is dedicated disseminating pasteurized donor milk to those in need. They also welcome donations of breast milk. Please spread the word!

If you are interested here is an additional link to some helpful breastfeeding techniques:

https://www.pregnancybirthbaby.org.au/breastfeeding-your-baby

Article info sources:

https://www.cdc.gov/breastfeeding/index.htm

https://www.womenshealth.gov/breastfeeding

https://www.womenshealth.gov/breastfeeding

Web Links to Local Orgs and Lactation Specialists

Tampa Breastfeeding and Lactation Center LLC: https://www.breastfeedtampa.com/

Breastfeeding Care and Consulting with Jocelyn Pridemore: http://breastfeedingcareandconsulting.com/

The Florida Breastfeeding Coalition: http://www.flbreastfeeding.org/

The Tampa Bay Breastfeeding Task Force: http://www.tbbreastfeeding.org/

La Leche League of Florida and the Caribbean Isles: http://www.lllflorida.com/lalecheleague/

Mother’s Milk Bank of Florida: https://milkbankofflorida.org/

Breastfeeding at M.O.M.

This article was researched and made possible by Alexandra Valdes as part of a service-learning internship with USF. Read more below or click the image to find out more about our student authors:

By

Diversifying Visibility to Decrease Mortality Rates

The American Medical Association says that women of color are 2- 6 times more likely to die from pregnancy complications than white woman depending on where they live. There are many factors that can contribute to this disproportionality, including quality of prenatal delivery and postpartum care. This mortality rate has significant detrimental effects on the black community as countless mothers are lost to this vicious cycle.

Chinelle Rojas, Dear Little One Birth Photography

Likewise, economically disadvantaged women are less likely to receive quality healthcare and are thus also less likely to receive prenatal care. This leaves black mothers more likely than white mothers to have hypertension, blood disorders, and other medical conditions that complicate their pregnancies. A recent article by USA Today explores the surprisingly high rates of hospitals blaming mothers’ preexisting conditions for high maternal mortality rates among women of color, especially black women. Before USA Today conducted a study and critically examined these shocking maternal mortality rates, these numbers have been overlooked because hospitals are allowed to keep this information private. By keeping this information away from the public, many hospitals have been excusing their poor outcomes by blaming the health of the mother.

Apart from the legal actions that can be taken to decrease mortality rates of women of color, there are organizations and individuals who, through means of advocacy, let this information come to the light and make a conscious effort to put a stop to it. Employing advocacy through visibility, Kimberly Seals Allers, is an international speaker, author, and the founder and organizer of Black Breastfeeding Week among other things. Kimberly is on a mission to “shift the paradigm, shift the discourse, shift the infrastructure, and shift the experience of womankind and motherhood for all”.

In the Tampa Bay area, Chinelle Rojas is working hard to shift the narrative. Chinelle is the birth photographer behind Dear Little One Birth Photography and is the founder of The Melanated Birth, in which she uses photography to represent women of color in birth. She believes that photography is a powerful tool, especially when u towards a powerful cause. Chinelle has observed the lack of diversity in the birth photography community and is taking steps towards solving this problem. She advocates that ultimately visibility can be an important step in reducing mortality rates for women. Photographing the births of women of color outside a hospital setting increases awareness of different birth options available apart from the standard hospital epidural birth. She is hoping to spread a message about the possibility of giving birth in alternative settings. She argues that many mothers-to-be, only know of other women who gave birth in a hospital. Seeing photographs of black women giving birth with the help of doulas and midwives in a comfortable setting can be the start of another woman’s successful journey into motherhood.

Chinelle Rojas, Dear Little One Birth Photography

“‘Imagine a world where our little pebble of documenting births can make waves on the mortality rate of mothers across the country or the world.’” –Chinelle Rojas

http://www.tampabirthphotographer.com/

http://themelanatedbirth.com/

Additional Resources:

http://blackbreastfeedingweek.org

http://www.kimberlysealsallers.com

Article sources:

American Medical Association. State-specific maternal mortality among black and white women: United States, 1987–1996. The Journal of the American Medical Association. 1999;282(13):1220–1222.

Young, Alison, et al. “Hospitals Blame Moms When Childbirth Goes Wrong. Secret Data Suggest It’s Not That Simple.” USA Today, Gannett Satellite Information Network, 9 Mar. 2019, http://www.usatoday.com/in-depth/news/investigations/deadly-deliveries/2019/03/07/maternal-death-rates-secret-hospital-safety-records-childbirth-deaths/2953224002/.

This article was researched and made possible by Vana Madhu as part of a service-learning internship with USF. Read more below or click the image to find out more about our student authors:

By

Doula, Midwife or Both?-Anticipating Pregnancy Needs and Birth Plans Today.

With pregnancy journeys changing in the modern world, offering a vast array of birth plans, classes, and medical options, one can get a bit overwhelmed. Support from Doulas and midwives can potentially help answer questions one may have as a mother, as well as provide additional support along with family and friends throughout this experience, whether it is your first pregnancy experience or not. During pregnancy, doulas and midwives provide companionship and a non-traditional approach to birth utilized in much of the world, however, they are not viewed as commonplace along with standard US medical practices regarding pregnancy and childbirth.

Though many have heard of midwives, most are unfamiliar with doulas until they begin research into their pregnancy experience or even hear from pregnancy companions. Doulas, or birth companions as they are commonly referred, are certified and experienced individuals who serve to provide encouragement and assistance to mothers throughout their pregnancy journey as well as after childbirth. Whether they provide emotional and physical assistance, educational information on child care and childbirth, or advising and comfort postpartum depression, their goal is to serve as a birthing companion, focused on the mother’s well-being to promote a healthy pregnancy experience with additional support.

A unique aspect of the mother doula relationship dynamic is that it begins before pregnancy, to support the birth plans of the mother, and is not focused on providing medical care, but experience knowledge on childcare, labor, and delivery. Doulas are can also be viewed as more involved in the pregnancy experience of an individual mother versus the traditional midwife, as they can assist with basic needs for families after pregnancy and directly assist in newborn care. Midwives, in contrast, are able to provide medical treatment and perform medical examinations on mothers, which requires advanced training in clinical nurse studies. However, they are also able to emotionally support mothers throughout the pregnancy experience in a similar fashion to a doula.

For the Tampa Bay area, the Tampa Bay Birth Network provides a vast array of information on local midwives and Doulas in the listing those available through their contact network and even has members themselves certified in the field of midwifery and doula studies. For example, Zulgeil  Ruiz-Ginés recently relocated to Florida in  2018 and currently serves on the Board of Directors of The Tampa Bay Birth Network as their Diversity and Inclusion Officer. However, she has undergone training in midwifery and doula certification. In her current position, she is finalizing her licensure to practice midwifery in Florida and hopes to serve her new community to the best of my abilities in the coming future.

Should you like to get in touch with the Tampa Bay Birth Network and Zul please email:

zulgeil@me.com

Article sources:

https://www.dona.org/what-is-a-doula/

https://americanpregnancy.org/labor-and-birth/having-a-doula/

https://www.allnursingschools.com/articles/doula/

About this blog: This blog has been created in partnership with a service-learning initiative at USF. Meet our interns!

Alexandra Valdes is a senior undergraduate student studying biomedical sciences at the University of South Florida. She is currently on the pre-med track and hopes future medical studies focus on women’s health and pediatrics after graduating in the fall of 2019. In partnership with the Honors College at USF, she is currently taking community service courses focused on women’s health and fertility studies that have given her this opportunity to be involved in this exciting community project with the Museum of Motherhood. Through this project, she hopes to help improve how information and communication between birth-support networks and mothers can occur within the Tampa Bay community to benefit families and mothers. She is the proud daughter and eldest sibling of an amazing single mother and a younger brother who have constantly shown her the support to pursue her dreams in higher education and personal life, and will always be grateful for their continual presence and impact on her life. She grateful for this opportunity and can’t wait to see where this project will go in the coming future

Hello, my name is Bhavana Madhu (I preferred to be called Vana) and I am a first-year undergraduate student at the University of South Florida, Tampa. I am pursuing a degree in biomedical sciences and am passionate about women’s health and women’s studies. In my free time, you can find me working out at the gym, reading a thriller novel, watching T.V. shows, or spending quality time with my family. I have a soft spot for spicy food, creepy YouTube documentaries, and science fiction novels. I found out about the Museum of Motherhood through a fellow classmate of mines, Alexandra Valdes (who is also an intern for the Museum of Motherhood), in our honors class ‘Fertility and the Future’. This class explores the social and behavioral sciences by examining family-making as a bio-cultural process and examining associated issues that arise across a variety of geographic contexts while incorporating local examples within national and global struggles to ‘reproduce’ the future. As part of the service-learning requirement for the class, Lexi and I have chosen to pursue an internship at MOM. I was interested in being an intern for the Museum of Motherhood because the goals and visions of MOM piqued my interest. I want to expand MOM’s reach and help network by connecting with potential partners and organizations in an effort to make this museum more well-known in the Tampa Bay area. I am excited to work with MOM and hope I can contribute something positive during my time as an intern here.