Meet the Newest Artist Resident at MoM: Marin Sardy

Marin Sardy is the author of the critically acclaimed memoir The Edge of Every Day: Sketches of Schizophrenia (2019). Sardy’s essays have appeared in the New Yorker, Tin House, Guernica, the Paris Review Daily, the Missouri Review, and many other journals, as well as in two award-winning photography books. A Pushcart Prize nominee, Sardy has three times had her work listed as “notable” in the Best American series, and she has been awarded residency fellowships at Hawthornden Castle and Catwalk Institute. She holds an MFA from Columbia University and teaches nonfiction writing for Pace University and Authors Publish.

Hurricanes and the World Today

Many of us have been shocked by recent world developments in the environment, social climate, and in economics. This week’s hurricane was a brutal reminder of just how devastating and close to home natural disasters can be.

Fortunately, MoM made it out of the storm relatively unscathed, but we still have many concerns for our Florida neighbors as well as those in dire situations across the globe.

Join our online roundtable forum this week with sociology fellow Amanda Watson.

Meet the Newest Artist Resident at MoM: Amanda Watson

Dr. Amanda Watson’s research explores how caregivers and community activists navigate complex institutional settings in their efforts to effect social change. Her interests include care, labour, disability, media representation of motherhood. She teaches on politics of family, global problems and the culture of capitalism, and power and conflict in Canadian society. Watson is an Associate Member of the Department of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies. She serves on the editorial board of Gender & Society.

Pandemic Parenting with Amy Swartz & The Drawing Board, by Rachael Grad

The Drawing Board is a collective – We are pleased to feature their work as part of our Pandemic Parenting exhibit online at MoM. The Drawing Board found themselves effected by the political issues, intense atmosphere, power structure, and inequity in University meetings. Afterward, they doodled intensely as a creative and healthy way to safely process. They used the fodder and energy to make work examining the tensions among creative people within a bureaucracy that guides teachers. Play with grids and office supplies countered notions of about superstructure.