MOM Art Annex: Exhibition & Education Center

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When Pandemonium Hits – Caregivers Unite!

When pandemonium hits, caregivers unite!

When families have to hunker down and stay put with their kids out of school, community contacts are restricted, and the workplace is disrupted, we must do everything within our power to stay positive.

When healthcare concerns trump everyday freedoms, each of us must look to the future and how we can make things better.

When Kimberly Seals writes an article for a widely-read publication about the often difficult and unpaid labor of caregivers, I pay attention.

Her recent article for #WomensHistoryMonth is online at the #WashingtonPost here.

I feel grateful to have contributed to this piece.

I feel grateful to you for reading it.

I feel grateful to live in her world (and yours).

I feel grateful to #teach #MotherStudies.

While you are spending more time social distancing, may you and your loved ones have food, may you and your loved ones have shelter, may you and your loved ones be well, may you keep the light of love inside you.

With Great Affection,

Martha Joy Rose

Get woke. Or, at least, well read: For your personal reading list, or if you’re in a book club, Rose suggests including titles that examine motherhood in a historical, racial or cultural context. She specifically recommends “Motherhood and Feminism” by Amber Kinser; “Reproducing Race” by Khiara M. Bridges; “Black Feminist Thought” by Patricia Hill Collins; and “The Price of Motherhood” by Crittenden. Take a six-week class with the Museum of Motherhood, or attend an online event this month. KSA

Kimberly Seals Allers and Martha Joy Rose at the Annual Academic MOM Conference in NYC

 

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The Founding Mothers: Women in Herstory

This month marks the International celebration of Women’s Day (Sunday, March 8) and Women’s History Month.

Both of these acknowledgments demonstrate an earnest desire to understand and honor the contributions of women. Wednesday, March 11th will mark the opening event for a new exhibit at USF, Women’s and Gender Studies Dept., curated by Martha Joy Rose.

Panels featuring the four waves of feminism flank the entrance to the exhibit titled The Founding Mothers: Women in Herstory. Also on exhibit are a myriad of art pieces including works by Rose, Christen Clifford, and Kim Alderman. This timely installation brings together feminist voices throughout herstory who have challenged conventional attitudes about gendered performance and motherhood through their writing, activism, and art. A multi-media interactive exhibit encourages participants to think critically about evolving family narratives and womyn’s place in society.

Please do come visit. See the impact Mother Studies can have on your life, perspective, and the future. Write INFO@MOMmuseum.org for more info. Flyer for the opening event is here. The exhibit will be up through May 8, 2020.

See more panels here online at the Museum of Motherhood: LINK

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How Income and Insurance Can Affect Breastfeeding Support For New Mothers

By Deann Shaffner

According to the CDC among the infants born in the United States, 83.8% start to breastfeed and by 12 months the amount of breastfed babies is down to 36.2%.

“A more recent study that used costs adjusted to 2007 dollars and evaluated costs associated with additional illnesses and diseases (sudden infant death syndrome, hospitalization for lower respiratory tract infection in infancy, atopic dermatitis, childhood leukemia, childhood obesity, childhood asthma, and type 1 diabetes mellitus) found that if 90 percent of U.S. families followed guidelines to breastfeed exclusively for six months, the United States would save $13 billion annually from reduced direct medical and indirect costs and the cost of premature death. If 80 percent of U.S. families complied, $10.5 billion per year would be saved. (Economic Effects).”

There are a variety of reasons mothers stop breastfeeding by 6 months including, concerns of milk supply, baby’s weight, issues with latching, unsupportive work policies, lack of prenatal leave, cultural norms, and lack of family support. So, what is a mother to do if she desires to breastfeed? In my previous post I gave an overview of the importance of seeking an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC); because they have received thorough lactation education. IBCLCs can be found in many areas, but many of them are employed in Hospitals, WIC offices, and Private Practice.

In Hospitals where an IBCLC or a Certified Lactation Counselor (CLC) are present, a visit to assist mom with a correct latch with baby, as well as address any breastfeeding concerns, is done during the mothers’ hospital stay. As the baby grows each week after his/her birth the breastfeeding experience can continue to change; bringing new questions on how to know if you’re doing this whole breastfeeding thing correctly! Most Hospitals will assist you during the entire course of your breastfeeding journey. However, some mothers forget that they can receive help from the hospitals IBCLC or CLC staff beyond the newborn stage.

Anna Kell Artwork Nursing_Install; MOM museum online exhibit

WIC participants benefit greatly from having the ability to contact breastfeeding support during pregnancy, after birth and up to the child turning 5. Many WIC offices have IBCLC, CLCs and Breastfeeding Peer Specialists; these specialists are experienced breastfeeding mothers that have undergone some training to assist mothers. At WIC, a parent could work with these available sources with the continued visits required at WIC for nutritional help. Although WIC is income-based and not available to every parent. As well as the fact, that some mothers report it is easier to access baby formula through WIC than breastfeeding help. (Source- Breastfeeding in the Public Arena Pg. 153 MJR).

Private Practice IBCLCs may face more of a challenge with assisting clients due to a conflicting relationship with insurance companies. Insurance providers have a variety of policy plans available to their customers. It may be in your best interest to call your insurance company during your pregnancy to see what is covered with breastfeeding supplies, (like a breast pump) or lactation visits, what documentation will be required, and the time frame you may face while waiting for coverage, if you have any, with your insurance. The information provided by your insurance company based on your plan, which can easily differ from other individuals’ plans, may help give you a better understanding of what you need to prepare for. Many insurance plans require an “in-network” provider, this means the lactation consultant has an agreement with the health plan to provide services. For some private practices, this may be easier said than done. An e-mail survey of U.S. IBCLCs in March of 2011 conclusion recorded that, “IBCLCs provide key care to a vulnerable population. However, we found that these services are not consistently reimbursed. IBCLCs poorly communicate their health care activities to insurance providers, but insurance providers also inconsistently recognize and reimburse IBCLC care.”

I recently interviewed IBCLC Heather Gansky, her practice is The Tree of Life Lactation located in South Carolina. She has also been a La Leche League Leader since August of 2016.

Question: Have you come across mothers experiencing difficulties nursing their baby and insurance companies denying coverage for Private Practice appointments with a Lactation Specialist?

Heather: Yes there are a ton of denials from insurance companies. Most moms do have to resubmit with different codes because each insurance seems to have it own way they like to do things.

Question: If a mother does not qualify for WIC, and is unable to attend La Leche League meetings, where do you suggest she go for assistance?

Heather: If I run into a parent who doesn’t have WIC or can not come to meetings I will either refer her to an IBCLC in our area, myself being one of them on a list about 3 others. Also, there are hospitals that have support groups, and some areas have baby cafés that anyone can drop into for help they need. It really depends on the situation and if she needs one on one help or peer to peer support.

Question: From your experience, how often do you think mothers seek breastfeeding help? Where is the best source for them to turn to address breastfeeding concerns? (Newborn stage, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, 2 +years.)

Heather: I find mothers sometimes wait too long to seek help for breastfeeding issues. It’s only until they are able to throw in the towel due to pain or poor weight gain in their baby that they actually seek help, and sometimes that’s much too late. Generally, we see babies in the newborn stage-1 month; then again around 3 months when babies really need to be good and suckling and using their tongues and mouths correctly to actively get milk out. If we didn’t see a baby in the early days but see them in the 3-month range it is typically due to mouth abnormalities which went undiagnosed either due to moms oversupply/ overactive letdown and the baby was riding the huge letdown portion of the feeding session.

Question: Do you think insurance companies are helpful to mothers seeking breastfeeding help? Or does the process of waiting for approval leave moms in a position of crisis where they turn to formula feeding, even though breastfeeding was their first choice in how they wanted their baby fed?

Heather: Some insurance companies have staff on hand to help with common issues/questions over the phone. There are some IBCLCs that are in-network for some insurance companies, but most work in offices and don’t do home visits. Most parents need help right away and aren’t waiting for insurance approval. In the case where parents don’t have money to pay for a consultation out of pocket they sometimes can go back to the hospital they delivered at however they are put back in the same situation with the same providers who are time-constrained and didn’t help them, to begin with. Many parents just don’t want to go back to those providers.

Question: Do you think that if health insurance companies were more supportive on coverage for visits with a lactation specialist that there could be a possible increase in breastfeeding rates?

Heather: Oh I’m sure of it. Most families are living paycheck to paycheck. They can’t afford a lactation visit… especially when one or both parents are out of work for the birth of the baby.

Question: Do you think families would benefit from visiting with an IBCLC before baby is born?

Heather: Yes. Education before birth is one of the key factors in initiation as well as the duration of breastfeeding.

The cost of breastmilk itself can be free. However, breastfeeding may have some additional costs. A mother could get around not having a breast pump and could choose to hand express, but meeting with an IBCLC or other lactation specialists may be more beneficial in helping you reach your breastfeeding goals. A visit with a consultant may range in price from $100.00-$300.00 depending on your location, but this is still a very low cost compared to a months’ worth of formula which can cost up to $243.00 per month, or you can use this Formula cost calculator to determine costs. If you plan to breastfeed, and during pregnancy you read the books, attend the breastfeeding classes, you may still want to be prepared to visit with a lactation specialist after the birth of your baby. Requesting funds as a baby shower gift, holiday or birthday, to visit with a lactation consultant would be an amazing gift to receive if you feel you may need help with affording the cost to visit with a consultant. You may be lucky enough to even be reimbursed by your insurance company after these visits, but it is best to save up on your own for a visit to avoid a feeding crisis, then waiting for the insurance to get everything in order. Either way, if you want to breastfeed, that is your choice. Income and Insurance coverage should not be left to chance.

More on education:

Please see the Free Webinars offered through the United States Breastfeeding Committee. The next 11/20 Session: Building Relationships: a Key to the Rise of our Indigenous Breastfeeding Communities
will be presented by Amber Kapuamakamaeokalani Wong Granite, Breastfeeding Hawai’i Coalition.

O ke kahua ma mua ma hope ke kūkulu: First the foundation, then the structure can be built.
This Hawaiian proverb teaches us the importance of building relationships in order to ensure the rise of our people.

Whether we seek to influence fellow learners, patients, or customers, we must get to know them before we can ask them to make a change. Once we seek and understand where they come from, what is truly important to them, and then help them unpack their stories, the real work can truly begin. During this session, we will hear an oli, Nā ʻAumakua. This oli acknowledges our ancestors, our land, and our nation. It invites strength, knowledge, and power into our space. MOM founder and director, Martha Joy Rose has participated in these and found them educational and helpful. (See the certificate at the bottom of the page)

Sources:

https://www.cdc.gov/breastfeeding/index.htm

https://mommuseum.org/2019/10/31/breastfeeding-education-might-not-be-what-you-think-it-is/

http://www.babycafeusa.org/

https://www.treelifelactation.com/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK52687/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23962773

https://kellymom.com/pregnancy/bf-prep/bfcostbenefits/

https://www.fns.usda.gov/wic/wic-eligibility-requirements

New Maternalisms, “Breastfeeding in the Public Arena”, Martha Joy Rose (Demeter Press 2016)

Deann’s Other Blogs at MOM: 

Breastfeeding Education Might Not Be What You Think It Is

Gender Disappointment

 

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Breastfeeding Education Might Not Be What You Think It Is

By Deann Shaffner

As a mother and La Leche League leader, I often hear stories from other mothers about their breastfeeding experience. The experiences they relay are often from their first few weeks after giving birth. Though every mother’s story is different, I have noticed an underlying issue many seem to face. I realize that many mothers, after leaving the hospital, are unsure of where to turn when they have difficulties with nursing.

The health care staff surrounding a mother during birth are extraordinary in their job. They care deeply about the well being of mommy and baby. But what happens when mom is about to nurse the baby and the newborn needs assistance? Each position of a health care provider during the mom’s transition from pregnancy to motherhood has an important role in assessing the overall health of the mother and the infant. Professionals are trained to prepare mothers for the birth process. However, when it comes to breastfeeding education, oftentimes things are left to chance. Why does this additional education matter? How do parents access information? These concerns usually surface once a mother is searching for help and she may receive a mix of confusing information; or sometimes, even though the mother is determined to breastfeed, she is given formula and told to use it to feed the baby.

Every breastfeeding experience is individualized and can be so very different. If breastfeeding is not working, a family can be forced to decide what is best for them and their child in the midst of a feeding crisis. There are many examples involving a new mother who is having nursing difficulties receiving conflicting information from a variety of well-intended sources. If her go-to people are the health-care providers she used for pregnancy and birth, and the information she needs to keep breastfeeding is not forthcoming, then she might not question the use of sample formula that was given to her upon her hospital release.

So, who has access to breastfeeding education? How much education is required? Why does it matter? Well, let’s start with OBGYNS and Midwives; I tried looking for an overall amount of hours in the breastfeeding education required during certification. I came across some articles that mentioned only a few hours of breastfeeding education were required. The basics are taught to assist the mother with the first latch. This education varies from state to state. Of course, as a patient, with breastfeeding-related questions, you can ask during your appointments with an OBGYN or Midwife, and they may direct you to a specialist in the field of lactation. After the birth of your baby, labor and delivery staff may also assist a mother with that first latch. Labor and delivery nurses are superheroes; however, they are not required to have any breastfeeding education when hired. Labor and delivery staff are encouraged to follow along certified lactation staff to gain more knowledge in helping mothers, and some hospitals provide basic breastfeeding education classes, twice a year to their employees, and also makes sure that staff watches the same breastfeeding videos they provide patients with.

If you notice your nurse is not able to address your needs with breastfeeding concerns, do not panic, they are doing their best to help you. You may also request a visit from a lactation consultant to get more in-depth information. Pediatricians, who see most of you and your baby, tend to get a lot of parents voicing breastfeeding concerns they also receive only a few hours of breastfeeding education. Again, they want what is best for your baby’s health, but it is your interest to find a lactation consultant to address potential nursing concerns.

A Certified Lactation Consultant has the most lactation education and a wealth of knowledge when it comes to breastfeeding. Getting help with breastfeeding, from a lactation consultant matters, since they have so many hours invested to become certified. From the International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) website, here is a list of 3 different pathways a person can take to become eligible to take the exam: “IBLCE provides 3 ways that candidates, health care professionals or non-health professionals, can obtain the required clinical practice in lactation and breastfeeding care:

Pathway 1 – Completing a minimum of 1000 hours of lactation specific clinical practice in an appropriate supervised setting within the 5 years immediately prior to examination application.

OR

Pathway 2 – Completing an accredited lactation academic program that includes at least 300 hours of directly supervised lactation specific clinical practice within the 5 years immediately prior to examination application.

OR

Pathway 3 – Completing an IBLCE-verified Pathway 3 Plan of at least 500 hours of directly supervised lactation specific clinical practice with an IBCLC as described in the Pathway 3 Plan Guide and obtained within the 5 years immediately prior to examination application.

Please note that personal experience breastfeeding your own children and experience helping family members and friends cannot be used to qualify for the IBCLC examination.” (1)

Another position in assisting a mother with breastfeeding is a Certified Lactation Counselor. This position allows one to receive an abundance of lactation education, but it is not as extensive as the IBCLC exam. To become a Certified Lactation Counselor, one must attend a 5-day course, more information on the curriculum is here: https://centerforbreastfeeding.org/wp-content/uploads/HCP_Spring_2020_Flyer.pdf

Other positions that include breastfeeding education and personal experience are Breastfeeding Peer Counselors and volunteering La Leche League Leaders, some areas also have support groups or local meetups for breastfeeding moms.

All the health care providers that assist a mother during pregnancy, birth and after birth want the best for mom and baby when it comes to health if you are not sure where to ask for help after having baby, speak up! A lot happens in a hospital setting after your birth, it is understandable to forget information, once you are home with baby, You can call the hospital you delivered at, a WIC office, insurance company, or see if a local moms group can help direct you towards a professional that may be able to assist you. Some websites such as this https://www.ilca.org/why-ibclc/falc may help you find a lactation consultant in your area.

Breastfeeding can be hard, but with the support of other mothers, and receiving assistance from a person who has had extensive education with lactation, there may be a better chance for you to reach your breastfeeding goals.

WANT MORE?

See one of MOM’s USF intern’s mosts on breastfeeding last semester with additional resources here.

Also, Kimberly Seals Allers, author of The Big Letdown which cites the economic and political influences of big business and breastfeeding in America, penned an OpEd citing multiple activists in the field including Museum of Motherhood founder, Martha Joy Rose in the  Washington Post – Read it here.

Image result for The Big Letdown

(1) Source: https://iblce.org/faqs-for-initial-candidates/

See Deann’s last blog on Gender Disappointment here.

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12 Days of Gender Studies – The Students of MC

ABOUT THIS BLOG SERIES:

Martha Joy Rose

The holiday season is upon us. You know the song: The Twelve Days of Christmas. This year we’ve got a little twist.

I’ve been teaching “Codes of Gender” at Manhattan College since August and the students have presented a number of ideas, poems, manifestos, and in-class presentations that explain some of their thoughts and interpretations of the work we’ve been engaged with.

This seems like a pretty good opportunity to wrap up the semester and share some of the students’ inspiration. The content is entirely the students’. Some have included their names and some have remained anonymous.

The important thing is that collectively we have been engaged in deep contemplation about the world we live in. Together we’ve explored language, theory, and the media in order to better understand difference as well as to more thoughtfully navigate our families, friendships, workplace, and deeply held belief systems. Sociology teaches us to expand our perspective and to look more honestly at our social and cultural experiences, breaking down privilege, power, and of course the patriarchy. I hope you enJOY reading these as much as I’ve appreciated working with these incredible young minds.

As the song goes:

Day 2: two turtle doves

Day 3: three French hens

Day 4: four calling birds

Day 5: five gold rings

Day 6: six geese a-laying

Day 7: seven swans a-swimming

Day 8: eight maids a-milking

Day 9: nine ladies dancing

Day 10: 10 lords a-leaping

Day 11: 11 pipers piping

Day 12: 12 drummers drumming

And a partridge in a pear tree!

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By Mario Ynfante

A Manifesta for Men Allies of Feminism in 2018

  1. To create a society where women aren’t seen as inferior, and instead are seen as equal. Eliminating derogatory vocabulary and replacing it with positive terms so that instead of bringing down our women, we push them to the forefront.
  2. To disagree with cultural norms and traditions that promote the patriarchy. Fighting against the way media, specifically movies, tv shows, music, and social media depicts women.
  3. To live in solidarity with women of all races, social class, and genders. Men included must help out with the cause.
  4. To act on our analysis and grievances. Only thinking about what’s wrong and analyzing it won’t change anything. A true activist doesn’t only think about what makes them uncomfortable they act on it.
  5. To not be afraid to speak up when women are being disrespected. Eliminating “locker room” talk because once again it promotes the patriarchy we currently live in.
  6. To educate yourself on what is sexual harassment and what is considered rape. Many of the things you say or do are wrong but they are so widely accepted in this androcentric society that they are ignored.
  7. To fight against double standards. Men are seen as “the man” when they have a lot of sexual partners but on the other hand women are seen as “sluts” if they do the same.
  8. Promoting the liberation of women’s bodies. Women can do what they want with their bodies, dress how they want, and most importantly have the right to choose whether they want to reproduce or not.

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By Isabella Bozkent

A Manifesto for a Better Tomorrow :

“In every way, shape, and form, we are at war” and so we must:

  1. Ensure the public is available to proper health care and health education. Regardless of race, class, sexual orientation, or gender.
  2. Make explicit the true nature of what is in the food people eat as well as the true nature of the chemicals in skincare, makeup, and other things absorbed by our bodies.
  3. Liberate those from the social constructs that prohibit them from living prosperous stigma-free lives. In liberating others, we liberate ourselves.
  4. “Pass the Equal Rights Amendment so we can have a constitutional foundation of righteousness and equality upon which future women’s rights conventions will stand.”
  5. Develop a world built off of understanding. To promote and praise curiosity that leads to information consumption. Knowledge is the only way to combat misunderstanding, fear of the “other”, and xenophobia.
  6. Promote the need for better treatment and rights for those who have been oppressed and victimized due to systemic oppression, abusive relationships, or unjust social dynamics. This task must be spearheaded by those with the privilege bestowed upon them from birth. They must recognize their privilege and use it for good as a tool to gain equality.
  7. Emphasize that caring for the environment, is caring for ourselves, and each other. To educate others of the very real issues that surround climate change. How many of these issues will affect the poor and disadvantaged before anyone else. How in many third world countries environmental issues are blamed on women and they are punished and ostracised from communities due to the lack of education and information available to them.
  8. “Work towards a nonviolent art by dedicating ourselves to living nonviolently. In art and life, create flexible and inclusive schemes for living that encompass respect, non-hierarchy, nonviolence, and tolerance. Art making is powerful; and a nonviolent art is a duty. Bodies such as the United Nations can be useful and fair, if: it stops favoring rich nations, it represents Latin America and Africa, not just North America, Europe and Asia, it prohibits the abuse of war in self-defense, veto power is taken away from the most powerful countries, and it enforces labor and environmental laws.” – Manifesto for a Utopian Turn.

Student-made Domestic Violence Awareness Brochure By Alia Flanigan & Mario Ynfante

 Download the PDF: Domestic Violence Brochure

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By Laura O’Neil

My Manifesta

  1. I believe all members of a family who have welcomed a new member of society 
should get paid family leave for six months.
  2. I believe all feminists should be a part of the movement in future years. The voting 
block ideally should be 18- 100, you are never too old to make a difference
  3. I believe boys at a young age should be taught the dangers of toxic masculinity. And 
be encouraged to be emotional, sensitive people.
  4. To put an emphasis on young children in school getting involved in politics. Teach 
kids about different political parties and the foundational beliefs each possesses. 
Change will come from the youth.
  5. To have universal healthcare available for all classes and races, regardless of gender.
  6. To be more vigilant in investigations of sexual assault/ harassment whether it takes 
place, at a university, a workplace, or in the military.
  7. To liberate women of all ages from slut-shaming and bullying. This can be more 
harmful than physical violence to someone’s psyche.
  8. Most importantly, to pass the Equal Rights Amendment.

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By Victoria Barreto 

My Manifesta

  1. To stop sluts shaming women for the choices they make when men aren’t slut-shamed for their choices.
  2. To stop blaming the victim in rape cases based on what they might have worn or any other way of blaming.
  3. To stop making excuses for boys’ sexist behaviors during adolescence such as “boys will be boys”. We should be teaching our boys to be more fluid and to respect women and other men.
  4. To make equal pay for women.
  5. To put more women in political office.
  6. To stop telling women what to do with their bodies such as telling women they cannot have an abortion or get access to birth control.
  7. Constitutional equality.
  8. Stereotypes against women and men’s attitudes such as the Kavanaugh case as an example.
  9. Affordable care act and fixing women’s health care.
  10. 4 out of five women are sexually trafficked.
  11. To higher more women in the sciences and technology fields.
  12. Maternity leave in the USA is horrible compared to other countries. Paid family leave and childcare: Behind other countries

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Accept Everybody

By Katie Compton

Over the course of my own childhood, there were various advertisements being made on the daily, whether they be about beauty and dieting, or something so simple as shampoo, the women that were showcased in these commercials were PERFECT. There is no other way to describe it but like as such because there was not a single flaw on their body. So, you can imagine the issues that this caused for me growing up, as I believed that that was how women were meant to look, always. In the video that we were asked to watch, it goes through the “behind the scenes” of the making of the advertisement of a woman who looks beautiful from the beginning, is Photoshopped into something that she is most certainly not.

They tweak her body into making it thinner, making her eyes bigger, her nose narrower, her breasts large, but her butt small; I mean the list just goes on and on. However, in comparison to this video, the Dove campaign did one very similar. They started close up to a woman with her natural face, but then as the video goes on, it shows all of the edits being made to her. By the end of the video, similar to the one we watched for class, the image at the end reflected nothing of the woman from the beginning.

Part of the reason I think I experienced such gender fluidity growing up was that I never thought I could compete with a look such as the one that was so frequently displayed everywhere I looked. The biggest issue with it was not that they were making the woman look like another human, but the fact that we, as a society, were forced to believe that this was how she looked all along. Her appearance was completely fabricated, and the issue that is entailed is how much young girls AND boys look to these advertisements thinking that is the only way they can look to be accepted by society.

Something certainly must change in the very near future if we are going to allow ourselves to start accepting our bodies and appearances for what they are. Because the fact of the matter is, you cannot Photoshop yourself when you are walking down the street. That is when you are completely and utterly, YOU. So, we as a society, are going to have to start making some adjustments in our advertising if we are going to make it a more accepting and body positive environment for ALL.

Works Cited:

“Dove Evolution.” YouTube, YouTube, 6 Oct. 2006,           www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYhCn0jf46U

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By Christian Munoz

The name of this poem is

As time goes by, women do not forget that easy

Or

The name of this poem is

Pain, suffering, harassment can’t be wiped out. Instead, it becomes scars

Or

The name of this poem is

Women had to endure unjust behaviors!

Or

The name of this poem is

Women having to endure patriarchy system

Or

The name of this poem is

Men as the main focus, while women hoping one day be able to work

Or

The name of this poem is

How being a man it is considered a privilege within society

Or

The name of this poem is

The fight against sexism continues

Or

The name of this poem is

Thanks to Sojourner Truth, for evolving women standards and to inspire others on keeping the battle going

Or

The name of this poem is

Making the world a better place to live

Or

The name of this poem is

Asking equality among all gender, race and cultural

OR

The name of this poem is

Enough is enough!!

Anonymous

Growing up in a house full of women has allowed me to really embrace my identity as a woman especially being the daughter of two very liberal, lesbian, feminists. I have realized that I am very privileged to have two very educated mothers who have supported me throughout my education and helped me look at the world with a very open heart. I do have to admit that I grew up in some kind of a bubble and I realized that before but it really made me realize that after the conversation we had in class the other day about the high schools we attended.

Growing up in my town it was very common for kids to openly express their affection for the same sex. In fact, it was actually very normal. I don’t even think I can count on my two hands the number of friends I had growing up that were openly bisexual or gay. I can remember the first time I realized that growing up in a town that was so accepting of others was as common as I thought. It was when we had planned to take a vacation to the Outer Banks. We ended up not going due to the enactment of the bathroom law that discriminated against transgendered people. Not only did we want to support a state with such awful laws, but we also did not feel safe going to a state with such policies that stand against the LGBTQ community. After learning about Judith Butler and her theory on gender, I realize how everything in this world is essentially based on male or female. With that said I like Butlers belief that gender is not something one is, it is something one does (Butler).

Each and every single day I continue to learn how privileged I am to be a heterosexual living in a world that is based on heteronormativity. I can’t even imagine what it would be like to have a fear of using a public bathroom. Looking at the world through the lens of a symbolic interactionist, I believe that a lot of these stereotypes, inequalities, and injustices are all due to the interactions that people have with society and they are all socially constructed concepts that are easily changeable.

Unlock

By Tiffany Recio 

Who am I?

Can you see me?

Do my curves seduce you?

Does my skin submit me?

Does my bank account show my value?

Does my sexuality make me normal?

Does my faith startle you?

Does my health show my talents?

Does my family intimidate you?

Does my intelligence shock you?

Does my accent alarm you?

Should I like pink?

Should I be silent?

Should I abandon faith?

Should I cover up?

Should I fail math?

Should I lose my accent?

Should I hide my home?

Should I be normal?

No. Nothing is Normal.

You can’t dominate me.

My skin is mine to conquer.

My value isn’t so easy to label.

You can’t shake my faith.

My abilities aren’t my title.

My family is my foundation.

Who cares for your disillusions?

Heteronormativity is archaic.

Sexism is a social disease.

Racism is ignorant.

Genderism is small-minded.

Ableism is cruel. 
Look at yourself, first.

Long Way To Go

By Laura O’Neill

The plight of women has been a long one.

Giving life to men who have no empathy ain’t fun.

The first waves of feminism began in 1820.

But it’s been two hundred years, and we still can’t get equal money.

All women have faced the struggle.

But black women have faced it double.

Sojourner Truth had to plead with her white sisters, to see her as a woman.

Looking back, our history can seem quite inhuman.

The battle is far from won when it comes to binary options
It’s time to throw away all your presumptions.

Radical feminism may seem intense.

But when a man gets paid a $1, Latina women earn just 54 cents.

Heteronormativity can keep people from living their best life.

Most women have big dreams, more than just a wife.

Cis-humans have to make being an ally a priority.

And eventually love and acceptance will be the majority.

What are the consequences of gender norms?

Olivia Warnock writes – Gender norms are perceived behaviors and personality traits surrounding one’s sex. When one acts outside of gender norms within a social setting, others can act out passive aggressiveness or even open hostility. Examples of common gender norms for men are “strong”, “assertive”, and “emotionless”. Common gender norms for women are “sensitive”, “irrational”, and “passive”. People can also assert something called social control which is when one attempts to change the course of the current situation by exerting their own expectations. This includes giving someone a dirty look, replying with a negative remark, earning less money from a job, or losing a promotion. Other discriminatory actions can include excluding individuals or groups from everyday social activities.

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Growing up in a Household Full of Boys

By Melanie Alberto
People always ask me
“What is it like growing up in a household with all boys?”
And I, of course, knew the answer to that.
Growing up in a household full of boys was wild.
We played sports inside the house
Wrestled with each other till we cried
And competed for literally everything
I was the only and youngest girl

But that did not stop me from being one of the boys
I never wore dresses,
Rarely played with dolls and dollhouses
Makeup was nonexistent to me.
I behaved like a boy because I grew up around boys
My father let me dress however I wanted to,
So naturally, I dressed in boy shorts, sneakers, and baggy shirts
It wasn’t until I was in Middle School that I started to see the difference.
Girls my age wore pretty floral dresses,
With flats instead of sneakers and hairpins in their hair
My brothers called them “girly”
And I thought to myself
“Am I not a girl because I’m not girly?”
I felt different because I looked different and acted different
In High School was when I changed
I still played sports and hung around with my brothers
But I dressed differently and
My brothers claimed I acted differently
Which now that I think about it I guess that I did.
It wasn’t that I changed who I was completely
I just welcomed and embraced my “girly” side
I still dressed in baggy clothes whenever I wanted to
Because clothes do not define my gender
Only I can define my gender
No one can.

I Am Black, Black as Night

Victoria Barreto

There, I was black as can be.

Aren’t I a woman too?

Whom should dance and sing,

Like the pale lady’s do?

No, I am black, and have no rights.

I am black, black as night.

I am black I see no light.

Mark of Cain that’s what I have,

My skin gives no privilege.

Instead it takes and takes

For I wish to scream,

“you have no power over me”

But I have to wait for the waves to come.

I have to wait for the first wave,

So, the pale ladies can get the vote,

Then I wait for the second,

So, they can start to work,

My back has scars from the work,

But the pale ladies need equality among pale men.

Then the third wave comes, this is my time.

I only had to wait hundreds of years to catch this wave.

It only took hundreds of years to free my bonds,

It only took blood sweat and tears for them to see,

See my color as good and something to save.

To see my experiences as valid,

To see my children as being worthy of education,

Not immigration.

It only took hundreds of years,

But its because I am black, black as night

And yet still I have no right.

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By

The Journal of Mother Studies 3rd Edition 2018, Residencies, and More

JOURMS: The Journal of Mother Studies (JourMS) 2018 is currently published online. Special thanks to Candace Lecco for her work as editor and to all our authors and editorial volunteers. Find out more here: LINK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RESIDENCIES AT MOM ART ANNEX 2019: M. Joy Rose has returned to Manhattan College or the spring 2019 semester. We anticipate accepting new residencies at the MOM Art Annex in St. Pete, Florida beginning August 2019-December 2019.

Meanwhile, students of all ages, who are interested in accessing course materials for Sociology of Family curriculum can watch for posts on our teaching website.

M. Joy Rose back to teaching at Manhattan College