MOM Art Annex: Exhibition & Education Center

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M.O.M. Conference Feb. 10-11th St. Pete, Florida

Thanks to those of you who have completed your payment confirmation for the M.O.M. Conference Feb 10-11, 2017 in St. Pete! If you are interested in attending the conference please write us. Space is extremely limited. RSVP only: info@MOMmuseum.org

Each Year the Museum of Motherhood works with academic partners and collaborators to create the Annual Academic M.O.M. Conference (2005-2016). 

SEE FULL SCHEDULE ONLINE HERE

In 2017 the Museum relocated to St. Petersburg, Florida.  We are excited to host our first I ❤ M.O.M. Conference. In addition, conference participants are invited to publish with JourMS (the Journal of Mother Studies) for dynamic, digital peer-reviewed content in the field of Mother Studies. The goal of the conference is to develop interdisciplinary approaches to Mother Studies and encourage information exchanges between thought-pioneers, activists, artists, academics, students on the subject of Motherhood, Fatherhood, and Family Life. [LINK]

Manhattan College MOM Conference

Manhattan College MOM Conference

Flights – Tampa International Airport. There are some great discount flights being offered now because of the holidays!

Hotel – Block Rate through January 15th

There are currently rooms on hold at the rate of $149.00 plus 13% tax. The room type for that rate will be One King Nonsmoking or you can request 2 Doubles Non Smoking. The rate includes a full breakfast daily from 6am-10am and complimentary Wi Fi and there is a swimming pool. The hotel is an easy walk, .9 miles from the M.O.M. Art Annex. Please use DISCOUNT CODE: Museum of Motherhoodto access this discount, or you can try your luck with one of the discount websites, like Hotels.com Website: Hampton Inn

Keynote

The keynote will be given on Friday evening by Andrea O’Reilly “BABY OUT WITH THE BATHWATER: DISAVOWAL & DISAPPEARANCE OF MOTHERHOOD IN 20-21ST CENTURY ACADEMIC FEMINISM.” For those who do not know Dr. O’Reilly, she is the foremost feminist author and academic on motherhood, and a Professor in the School of Women’s Studies at York University in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. She is the author and editor of eighteen books on motherhood and founder of Demeter Press. [LINK]

Special Guest Artist Announcement

We are very excited to announce that guest artist Christen Clifford will be bringing her “Feminist Peep Show” performance as part of the conference in February. Christen Clifford, a feminist writer, performance artist, curator, professor, actor, and  mother artist whose performances and writing use her experiences of maternal sexuality, menstruation, rape, and the female body as material, has launched a new project called Pussy Bow. Read more about Christen HERE.

Agenda

The conference agenda will commence as follows:

  • Thursday evening cocktail party at M.O.M. from 7-8:30PM. RSVP.
  • Presentations Friday- 1:00 PM -5:00 PM.
  • Keynote Friday – 5-6 PM
  • Saturday –  9:45AM-5:00 PM
  • Feminist Peep Show 1:00 – 2 PM w/Christen Clifford
  • We will also host a Friday evening in Kenwood, and there are several museums and sights to see as well as excellent dining while you are in town.

Residencies

The residency program has launched. M.O.M. will be hosting students, authors, artists, and academics onsite beginning January 1, 2017. The M.O.M. Art Annex Residency Program is open to those students, artists, and scholars engaged in the study of women, mothers, fathers, and families. This live/work space in the heart of downtown St. Petersburg, Fl is an opportunity for those wishing to focus for an extended period of time on research, writing, or art-making in a quiet setting, close to amenities, in a supportive environment. This opportunity is offered at no charge to applicants in exchange for some commitment to the M.O.M. facility each week [Link].

More about M.O.M.

The Museum of Motherhood (M.O.M.) is an exhibition and education center dedicated to the exploration of family – past, present, and future with a focus on mothers, fathers, and families.

M.O.M.’s mission is to start great conversations, feature thought-provoking exhibits, and share information and education. Our aim is to collect, preserve, and disseminate articles, books, artifacts, images, and research on the science, art, and history of all aspects of procreation, birth, and caregiving. We care about those engaged in these activities, and actively promote members of the community interested in the emerging areas of Mother and Father Studies. [LINK]

 

Please RSVP if you are interested in attending any portion of these events: info@MOMmuseum.org

 

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On My Experience of Motherhood Studies

PatriciaHillCollinsYou may have seen some of my blog posts over the last several weeks that came from the response papers I wrote for the Introduction to Mother Studies course offered through the museum. With a capstone paper using research on current topics related to reproductive technology, the class culminated three weeks ago last Sunday afternoon. I promised myself that I would not begin watching the newest season of Orange is the New Black until the course finished, and I have since been relishing these moments of TV consumption.

Other than satisfying my Netflix addiction, I have been able to reflect back on the course since finishing it. I was a Sociology major in college but took a lot of classes in the Women’s Studies department. Adrienne Rich and Patricia Hill Collins contributed foundational texts to our study in Introduction to Mother Studies. The names and works of these scholars were familiar to me from undergrad. However, studying them in the context of Introduction to Mother Studies, I began to see them in a new light…as mothers. Because of the strength of their words and power of their knowledge, I had always identified them as feminist first, whatever else second. But in a movement where “the personal is political” has been a rallying cry, perhaps for them, they would see themselves as mother/sister/self first, feminist second.

In “Beyond Mothers and Fathers,” Barbara Katz Rothman, a pioneer to the movement, said: “Mothering is an activity, a project…[M]otherhood…is not just a physical or emotional relationship – it is also an intellectual activity.” Scholars and writers have known this and have been doing Mother Studies work for a long time. Whether we have seen it as such or not, the personal has always been political. When women gave birth in their homes attended by practiced midwives, and then again when slander campaigns saw the shift to in-hospital births, Mother Studies was in action. When white middle-class housewives’ alienation derived from raising children in suburban America gave way to the rise of second-wave feminism, Mother Studies was in action. When the eugenics movement created a legacy of racist and anti-poverty sterilization policies, Mother Studies was in action. When images of the super-mom were contrasted with social commentary on the decline of the American family, Mother Studies was in action. When feminists came to the defense of Mary Beth Whitehead, a surrogate who refused to give up her baby, questioning what makes a mother, Mother Studies was in action. We are not recreating the wheel. Our Introduction to Mother Studies is the first time that we are calling it such and the first time we are carving out a space for it as a legitimate discipline. We are making the personal political…and academic.

Find out more about classes in Mother Studies online here.

By: Jenny Nigro, MoM Online Intern

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M.A.M.A. – Mothers ARE Making Art – New Installation(s)

WHAT: The ProCreate Project, the Museum of Motherhood and the Mom Egg Review are partnering for bi-monthly on-line presentations featuring M.A.M.A. – Mothers are Making Art.
WHEN: The 1st and the 15th of each month words and images will highlight the joy and the challenges of being both a mother and an artist.
WHERE: Online is the place! We will host works of art about mothers and mothers-to-be; featuring academic and creative writing in order to promote women internationally and generate cultural exchanges and opportunities.

WHY: We are determined to explore the extraordinary experiences of mothers and how, by means of channeling these new and powerful energies a person can cultivate both motherhood and art. However, support is needed and awareness must be raised to facilitate this process and to finally empower it.

We strive to give voice to all women, make acceptable room for “feelings,” sensations, and interpretations without judgment; we want to make space for mothers in the arts to display their work and move a conversation about “the art of motherhood” forward. DOWNLOAD THE PRESS RELEASE.

@ProcreateProj  @MOMmuseum @TheMomEgg #JoinMAMA

slide5This month features Lynn Lu (Pictured on homepage and above here) and Beck Tipper, whose writing is highlighted on the M.A.M.A. page here.

Paradoxes for the Virtual collaborative Skype performance with Birgitta Hosea on YouTube [LINK].
Lab451LONDON; Camden Image Gallery; London, UK. 2015
In a game of Exquisite Corpse, Lynn Lu (live) and Birgitta Hosea (projected from SKYPE) explore intimacy and the generation of interpersonal closeness across a virtual divide through a scored series of shared confidences.

-PREGNANCY AND AFTER MOTHERHOOD INSPIRED SEVERAL OF THE LYNN LU PERFORMANCES AND INSTALLATIONS-

Lynn Lu received a BFA from Carnegie Mellon University with a major in Sculpture and a minor in Graphic Design in 1999. In 1998, she studied with Christian Boltanski at the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and at the École Marchutz in Aix-en-Provence. She earned her MFA in New Genres at the San Francisco Art Institute in 2002, and completed a PhD program (ABD) at Musashino Art University in Tokyo in 2008, on a full scholarship from the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs. In 2010 she was awarded the degree of Doctor of Philosophy by the University of Newcastle in Australia.

Since 1997, Lynn has exhibited and performed extensively in the United States, Singapore, Japan, China, Korea, Thailand, Vietnam, Philippines, Indonesia, Cambodia, Australia, New Zealand, UK, France, Switzerland, Germany, Austria, Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Estonia, Poland, Belarus, Czech Republic, Turkey, Greece, Argentina, and Canada.

See more about Lynn at ProcreateProject.com

MAMA_Logo_2015

To read Andrea O’Reilly’s piece on Feminist Motherhood go to our link here, and read her piece also live online at ProCreate Project.

Art and Performance by Nicola Canavan

Art and Performance by Nicola Canavan: Raising the Skirt

Raising the Skirt: ‘La mar es posa bona si veu el cony d’una dona’, is a Catalan belief in the vagina, translated as ‘the sea calms down if it sees a woman’s cunt’. (Images by Dawn Felicia Knox)
The gesture of lifting the skirt has been translated across the world. It is known as Anasyrma or Ana-Suromai (Ancient Greek), Anlu (Kom Communities) and many others. A flash of the cunt has been known to calm other forces of nature too, in Madras (India) women were known to subdue storms by exposing themselves. In other folklore Women could drive away the devils, evil spirits and warriors as seen in Fontaine’s ‘Nouveaux Contes’, all through the power and beauty of their cunts. ‘Raising the Skirt’ has influenced my practice for many years (www.nicolacanavan.com); by questioning notions of beauty and the status of women socially and culturally across many religions, and how this affects how the female body is translated across mass media; I feel it would be an important step back to go forward, to reclaiming the cunt as a powerful tool in assertion.

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A (Belated) International Women’s Day Reflection

The Dinner Party

Happy belated International Women’s Day! Wanting to do something different to honor the occasion, I decided to take a page out of my own book and make a trip out to the Brooklyn Museum yesterday to see Judy Chicago’s iconic piece of feminist art, The Dinner Party. (Note: my previous post erroneously listed this installation as a special exhibit currently on display at the museum. Judy Chicago’s Dinner Party is actually owned by the Brooklyn Museum, a gift acquired and donated to the museum by Elizabeth Sackler, who also happens to be the benefactor of the museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Visitors of the museum can check out The Dinner Party any time in the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art).

I arrived to the museum just in time to catch a late Sunday afternoon tour of the exhibit offered by one of the museum guides. And I’m glad I did – there is as much detail/purpose/intention in the historical and cultural detail of the piece as there is in the craftsmanship of every place setting…or should I say craftswomanship? Because that is (part) of what it is – a piece that honors the contribution of the women artists that historically created intricate china patterns, elaborate weaving designs, and detailed pottery molds. The guide explained that The Dinner Party was, and as it is currently, assembled in a triangle shape, an homage to the vulva and feminine. Each of the three sides of the triangle represent a time period – prehistory-Roman Empire, beginnings of Christianity-Reformation, and finally, American Revolution to second wave feminism.

As we rounded the corner to the second face of the triangle, the guide remarked that most of the women honored there were either nobility or nuns. She asked why we thought that might be. Most of us assumed the first two of the three-part answer: because history was a record of the powerful/wealthy/victorious/ruling class, and because these women were educated. The third part did not come so readily to mind for me. Our guide informed us that furthermore, these classes of women did not bear the sole responsibility of raising children. Noble women had a team of nurses and servants to help rear their children, while nuns did not procreate at all. So these women had more freedom, luxury, and educational capital to participate politically and socially in their milieu.

As the tour drew to a close and I considered the piece one last time, I had to wonder: how much of women’s history went unrecorded because it happened to lay women in the lower social strata, but also, what discoveries, manifestos, and leadership went unnoticed, unwritten, or unfulfilled because women’s labor has been so historically undermined? I bet that Judy Chicago would say that just my imagining these questions would make her work a success.

Written by: Jenny Nigro, MoM online intern